10 Things Young Women May Not Know About Breast Cancer

Here are 10 things you probably haven’t heard.

Posted on | By Young Survival Coalition | Comments ()
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A Breast Cancer Survivor Demonstrates How to Do a Self Exam (2:25)

While breast cancer is typically seen in older women, it occasionally affects young women, too. The challenge with young women is that the core screening test for breast cancer, the mammogram, is less able to detect breast cancer because breast tissue is denser in younger women. On top of that, less of a focus is placed on young women in medical research because they make up a minority of cases. How much do you know about breast cancer in young women? Here are 10 things you probably haven’t heard.

1. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women aged 15 to 39.

2. Nearly 80% of young women diagnosed with breast cancer find their breast abnormality themselves.

3. The treatments for breast cancer can lead to early onset menopause accompanied by the unpleasant symptoms and fertility problems usually seen in older women.

4. Because fewer young women get cancer, they are often underrepresented in or even left out of research on breast cancer.

5. Young women who have breast cancer tend to have more aggressive types that are harder to treat.

6. About 250,000 women in the US who are breast cancer survivors were diagnosed before 40.

7. Treatment for breast cancer can have a long-lasting impact on a woman’s ability to have children in the future.

8. About 1,000 women under the age of 40 are expected to die each year from breast cancer.

9. Breast cancer in young women will often hit when expecting or caring for a young child, with almost 30% of cancers diagnosed within several years of childbirth.

10. Body image issues can arise for younger women who may see physical changes as a result of treatment. This can lead to intimacy issues for many women, both married and single.

Provided by Ford Warriors in Pink

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Article written by Young Survival Coalition
Young women facing breast cancer together.