The 24-Hour Antioxidant Diet

Reduce your risk of disease in only one day. Rather than taking a supplement, get your daily dose of antioxidants from whole foods, where compounds naturally work together to unlock each other’s power. These 3 meals maximize the amazing preventative properties of antioxidants.

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This 24-hour diet plan from dietician Kristin Kirkpatrick amps up your daily antioxidant intake with delicious, nutritionally-rich meals. See what to eat and how to prepare your food to unlock maximum disease-fighting benefits.

Breakfast: Power Smoothie

Start your day with a breakfast power smoothie to help combat certain cancers. Additionally, this smoothie helps to provide energy, control cravings, and get antioxidants into your body early to help you tackle the stress of your day. Feel free to use frozen berries. Freezing does not affect their nutrient potency, so you can stock up on berries while they’re in season. Choose wild berries as opposed to processed or cultivated varieties.

Ingredients

1/2 cup wild blueberries

1/2 cup blackberries

1/2 cup strawberries

1/2 cup raspberries

1 cup unsweetened pomegranate juice

Directions

Combine berries and pomegranate juice in a blender, and blend to desired consistency. 

One-Two Punch Lunch: Tomato Soup With Broccoli Florets and Kale Salad

For lunch, enjoy a bowl of tomato soup with a side salad of broccoli florets and kale. Tomatoes have the antioxidants lycopene, vitamin C and vitamin A. This soup is the perfect source of lycopene because heat breaks down the cell walls of the tomato to unleash its potency.

Recent studies have shown that eating tomatoes and broccoli together creates greater health effects. Broccoli has beta-carotene, indoles and ITCS – all cancer-fighting compounds. Be sure to not overcook the broccoli, which can destroy its nutrients. Lightly steaming the broccoli is best; this is even better than eating it raw, because the heat helps enzymes bond to your digestive tract, rather than get flushed away. Healthful enzymes are only activated after broccoli has been cut, so chop the florets in half or quarters.

Double-Duty Dinner: Poached Salmon With Artichoke and Sweet Potato Gratin

Cook the salmon by either baking, broiling, poaching or steaming. Frying salmon or any fish will sap the nutrients; using an outdoor grill can add cancer-causing chemicals. Pair with this delectable gratin, containing artichokes, one of the only foods that maintain its nutrients when cooked.

Artichoke and Sweet Potato Gratin

Ingredients

2 tomatoes, diced

2 1/4 cups artichoke hearts

1 bunch scallions

2 tbsp olive oil

1 1/2 tsp dried oregano

1 tsp salt

1 (15 oz) can cannellini beans

1/2 cup chicken stock

1/2 tsp black pepper

1 1/2 lbs sweet potatoes

Directions

Preheat oven to 350° F. Chop tomatoes and artichoke hearts; mix with scallions, olive oil, add about half of the oregano and salt.

In a food processor or blender, combine beans, pepper and the remaining salt and oregano.

Slice sweet potatoes into halves and add to lightly oiled dish. Add remaining salt and pepper. Add the bean purée and artichokes, covering with additional potatoes. Top with tomato slices. Add any remaining seasoning and cover.

Bake for 1 hour, or until tender. Remove cover, and bake for 10 more minutes or until topping is golden brown.