Cancer-Proof Your Life: Hidden Risks and Prevention

The best cancer weapon is prevention – equal parts awareness and action. While smoking and obesity are known cancer risks, there are lesser-known conditions and lifestyle choices that can make you more susceptible to a cancer diagnosis. Additionally, while exercise and a balanced diet are known to improve your health, there are other activities and practices you can incorporate into your life to decrease your risk.

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Dr. Oz reveals the 5 biggest cancer risks for women over 40 and the preventive measures you should watch out for.

Hidden Cancer Risk #1: Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous risk factor when it comes to pancreatic cancer, often referred to as a silent killer. For many physicians, this is the most feared cancer because it is often so difficult to detect until it gets into the advanced stages. The link between the two exists because type 2 diabetes is associated with increased inulin production; inulin causes the growth of cells and the proliferation of blood vessels in the pancreas. This increased blood flow creates a hospitable environment for tumor formation. Diabetes is also linked to liver, uterine and bladder cancer.

 

Prevention Tip: Make sure you Know Your 5 numbers, including your blood sugar levels. Keep yourself informed; to learn more about the antiangiogenic foods that starve cancer cells by cutting off their blood supply, click here. To learn more about pancreatic cancer, click here.

Hidden Cancer Risk #2: Calcium Deficiency and Colon Cancer

Calcium deficiency poses a threat when it comes to colon cancer. Fewer than 15% of women over 40 get the calcium they need. Calcium works to stop the growth of cancer cells and detoxifies the system, preventing these outside invaders from wreaking havoc in the colon, where they can promote cancer. When a calcium deficiency is present, cancer cells have the chance to grow large and more threatening.

 

Prevention Tip: To ensure that you are getting enough calcium, Dr. Oz recommends a daily calcium cocktail: 600 mg of calcium, 400 mg of magnesium and 1000 IU of vitamin D. Natural sources of vitamin D include dairy, spinach and kale. To learn more about calcium, click here. To learn more about preventive screenings for colon cancer, click here.