The Secrets to Increasing Testosterone in Men

Make sure you know when you really need a testosterone boost, and how to get one as naturally as possible.

Posted on | By Harry Fisch, MD | Comments ()
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Does Your Man Have Low T? Pt 1 (4:52)

As a specialist in men's reproductive health, I'm seeing more and more cases of guys who are on prescription testosterone replacement medication. Sales of testosterone have boomed in recent years thanks to new ways to get it into your body, such as gels, creams and injections. The current situation with testosterone replacement treatment is problematic for many reasons, including the fact that, by one estimate, nearly a quarter of the guys getting prescriptions have not even had their testosterone levels checked. In the words of one recent physician editorialist, this is "appalling." No man should be taking testosterone unless they have low testosterone levels and symptoms.

Many men are unaware that testosterone replacement treatment shuts down a man's natural production of the hormone, often causing the testosterone-producing cells to stop working and his testicles to soften and shrink. If a guy suddenly stops taking testosterone after using it for more than a month or so, he's very likely to feel terrible – he could have low energy, low sex drive, be irritable, and even feel depressed. These withdrawal symptoms powerfully motivate guys to keep refilling their "T" prescriptions!

What most patients – and many doctors – don't know, however, is that there's a safe, effective way to both wean men off of their testosterone replacement and raise T levels. Rather than replacing testosterone, clomiphene citrate, marketed as Clomid or Serophene stimulates the production of two key hormones: follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). Both are vital to men. FSH stimulates sperm production in the testicles, and LH stimulates testosterone production.

A number of studies have demonstrated that clomiphene can effectively raise T levels – and it does so by working with the body rather than by tricking it with external testosterone. In one study, for example, the testosterone levels in the men taking clomiphene more than doubled after several months. Why haven't more men and doctors heard about clomiphene? It's been used for decades to help infertile men (and women), so it's available as an inexpensive generic. The other reason is that clomiphene is not approved by the FDA for use in increasing testosterone levels in men.

Article written by Harry Fisch, MD
Men's Health Expert