The Bigger, Better Deal

We’ve all heard of the BBD (bigger better deal). It comes in many forms. In electronics stores, it’s the 47-inch flat screen TV instead of the 37-inch. In cars, it’s getting the sedan over the hatchback. And in food, it’s getting a value meal instead of a sandwich.

Posted on | Bill Larson | Comments ()

We’ve all heard of the BBD (bigger better deal). It comes in many forms. In electronics stores, it’s the 47-inch flat screen TV instead of the 37-inch. In cars, it’s getting the sedan over the hatchback. And in food, it’s getting a value meal instead of a sandwich.

There are times these days when I run to grab a bite to eat at my FFBF (fast food best friend), that has the best grilled chicken sandwich ever. Anyway, I get to the “on deck circle” (the position before you get to order) and I look at the entire menu, and notice how much cheaper it is to get the value meal with my grilled chicken sandwich.


Why is it cheaper to get yummy French fries and a soda? It’s just the economics of fast food. You so want to save money and get the most “bang for your buck,” so it’s tempting to get the BBD. I did the math. It’s actually the same amount of money roughly to get the value meal rather than components of the meal as separates. Don’t believe me? Check it out at your FFBF sometime.


OK, so I get up to the window and I decide to order “one grilled chicken sandwich please, no lettuce, and a small side cole slaw.”

Now I have to say my FFBF has great customer service, including how they take care of you at the drive-thru. “Thank you for your order. Would you like the better value meal or just the sandwich and cole slaw?” See, I do get why they do this. It’s the up-sell. It’s their job and sometimes people do, in fact, order the meal without saying the designated number of the meal which inadvertently makes it more expensive. So the friendly person is doing a service. But it also is a temptation we, and I, don’t need. “No, thank you. Just the sandwich and the cole slaw,” I say as I receive my total and drive around to the pick-up window.


This happens in my CSBF (convenience store best friend), too. Now that I have weaned successfully off of having a daily soda or 2, I do get one as a treat, like last night (sometimes after dinner I really do need one). But that’s when I notice how much “cheaper” it would be to get a whole 6-pack of 24-ounce bottles instead of 2 individual 20-ounce bottles (my new total soda allotment for the week).

See, the BBD is everywhere.


Some of those constant choices we make along this weight loss journey don’t just involve food, they involve money. In today’s economy it is understandably hard to know you are ultimately spending away more money than you could if you’d purchased the BBD (the value meal; the 6-pack of soda). But I like to think of it in the same way Samuel L. Jackson thought about giving up his money at the end of one of the greatest films of the 1990s, “Pulp Fiction.” In that movie he justified giving up his $1,500 because he was “buying something” for his money. In my world, when I spend the extra money I know I buy satisfaction. Satisfaction that I beat a system that seems designed to thwart a weight loss journey at every turn every where.


That is why the BBD doesn’t appeal to me. You may end up spending slightly more money but it’s you that comes out on top in the end.

Blog written by Bill Larson
Bill Ivory Larson has lost a total of 175 pounds, without surgery or a special diet. In 2005, when he moved from Chicago to...