Cancer Survival, Nutrition and Smaller Portions

Another amazing week! Started in Chicago, then Cleveland, Norfolk, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, DC, and Cleveland. Our Cleveland Clinic–Northwestern combined Preventive Care and Integrative Medicine Conference finished up spectacularly, and I got recommitted to smaller portions. Then onto caring for people in Cleveland before a 700 Club appearance and bantering with Pat Robertson about vitamin D (the appearance was to talk about the tips in our new book, YOU: Raising Your Child, about how to keep bugs from your kids, the infectious ones, not the bed variety), then to the Oz Show for a taping of the first show of next year. Then went on to meet with Lutron, a company that wants what the Cleveland Clinic has done for wellness for its employees, then on to WETA/PBS to plan on my YOUNGER YOU 26-episode TV show (ask your local PBS station to carry it), and the FDA to discuss SmartTots. We’ll get to all of these, but first Integrative Medicine.

Posted on | Mike Roizen, MD | Comments ()

Another amazing week! Started in Chicago, then Cleveland, Norfolk, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, DC, and Cleveland. Our Cleveland Clinic–Northwestern combined Preventive Care and Integrative Medicine Conference finished up spectacularly, and I got recommitted to smaller portions. Then onto caring for people in Cleveland before a 700 Club appearance and bantering with Pat Robertson about vitamin D (the appearance was to talk about the tips in our new book, YOU: Raising Your Child, about how to keep bugs from your kids, the infectious ones, not the bed variety), then to the Oz Show for a taping of the first show of next year. Then went on to meet with Lutron, a company that wants what the Cleveland Clinic has done for wellness for its employees, then on to WETA/PBS to plan on my YOUNGER YOU 26-episode TV show (ask your local PBS station to carry it), and the FDA to discuss SmartTots. We’ll get to all of these, but first Integrative Medicine.

Integrative Medicine


Spectacular sessions on Saturday and Sunday in the midst of Chicago’s stormy weather. First, with the great T. Colon Campbell who authored The China Study; he spoke on nutritional therapy for cancer – is it real or only alternative? The data shows it is real, and not just preventive. A brilliant talk: nutrition changes growth of cancer cells even in advanced stages, and cancer is reversible even in late stages. He pointed to many studies that showed cancer was promoted in every species surprisingly by  animal protein (especially, I was surprised by casein, milk protein in animals). Reversal was possible if the animals (once cancer developed) were switched to a less than a  5% protein diet versus 20% protein diet; animal protein, even shortly after a meal, can turn on a gene that increases cancer-promoting enzyme activity. Specifically, animal protein promoted growth of cancer; soy and wheat protein did not cause the increased carcinogenesis. His takeaway: humans should reduce protein consumption to 10% of calories (60 grams a day) at most, and try to do with only vegetarian-based protein. Also, he pointed to reducing total fat to about 10%; most of the diet he recommends is complex carbohydrates.

Nutrition therapy (plant-based foods) may be promising for cancer, but it is considered “alternative” by most health professionals. While it does not fall into the realm of conventional evidence-based medicine, it has shown to be consistently effective. He wondered why there is no NIH for nutrition; medical student offerings on nutrition are virtually non-existent. He felt nutrition must be central to future health practices, both preventative and therapeutic. No other medical therapy is as rapid, comprehensive and as substantial as nutrition. Dr Mitch Gaynor presented compelling evidence on the benefits of lifestyle effects in improving cancer survival and how he uses it in his practice. Dr. Judy Fulop supports what T. Colin Campbell said, but individualizes for patients based on epigenetic changes. She negotiates with patients and asks to add cruciferous veggies (watercress, arugula, radishes are unusual ones).  Dr. Deljeet Singh reported using diet as an adjuvant to treat ovarian and breast cancer. The conference continued to be outstanding as Dr. Raul Seballos and Tanya Edwards reviewed the data on vitamin D3. The bottom line from Dr. Edwards: Take 1000 to 2000 IU of vitamin D3, and due to pill variability, get your vitamin D3 measured.

On Sunday, Anita Misra-Hebert, MD presented compelling evidence on how stress adversely affects the outcome of many treatments and increases the risk of many diseases, including many cancers like breast, colon, and prostate. Dr. Devries related how 1 additional serving of leafy greens per day reduces heart and cancer risks by 23%. Dr. Klein spoke on screenings for prostate cancer. If age 44 to 50 and PSA  (prostate-specific antigen) is less than 0.7, or age 60 and less than 2, there is a very low risk of a prostate cancer threat to your life. Dr. Eng also spoke about genetic screening. My takeaways for you: If you have one test and those are your PSA values, you probably need another PSA every 5 or 10 years.

All planes from Chicago to New York were cancelled, so we rented a car and drove back. My take: I learned a lot questioning Dr. Klein and Dr. Esselstyn (Essy), and Essy is a crazy driver. I will talk about Essy’s keynote talk in next week’s blog—it is too important to give it less than a full blog.

 

The best new medical article of the week from JAMA: Women who exercise most days (30-minute+ walk) gain 80% less weight over 20  years; men 50% less. To  follow up on what I learned at the conference, we need smaller portions; the best smaller portions are of complex carbs and maybe add nuts and legumes in moderation. Monday and Tuesday were spent at the Cleveland Clinic getting to see patients and coaching them toward health. Flew late Tuesday to Norfolk, Virginia, home of Pat Robertson’s 700 Club—it has been on the air since 1965. Why is it called the 700 Club? In 1965, Pat needed $7000 to stay on the air (I think he later sold CBN and its channels to Disney for a billion-plus dollars 10 or so years ago). He tried to get 700 people to donate $10 each to keep him on the air—he only got 330 donations (more dollars per person though, so he was able to stay on the air). Maybe he should have called it the 330 Club.

Wednesday, December 15, was quite a day—was on CBN 700 Club talking about YOU: Raising Your Child; then flew to NY for a taping of The Doctor Oz Show. We reviewed data on omega-3s and DHA. We should all take DHA (the active omega-3 for the brain and eyes in fish oil and algae); 20 mg per day until the age of 13; then 600 mg per day until 60 (athletes should take 1200 mg); 1000 mg a day seems appropriate after age 60. Mehmet takes 600 mg of DHA a day now. I alternate 800 mg from 4 DHA capsules on even-numbered days and 1000 mg on odd-numbered days. 

On Thursday, spoke with management at a great company near Philadelphia—Lutron—that manages lighting and shading to decrease energy usage. They want to increase their competitiveness by decreasing health costs and increasing employee satisfaction. We discussed what the Cleveland Clinic can do for their food, physical activity, stress, and tobacco employee programs.

Friday was spent in Washington, DC discussing my new upcoming series of 26 thirty-minute shows on PBS taped by WETA (the PBS affiliate in DC that tapes and airs the Newshour on PBS). The new show will be titled YOUNGER YOU and feature Roizen’s Rules for a YOUNGER YOU. 

Later Friday, I taped a video news release at the FDA; the FDA has mothered a new foundation to support research on an important problem. Look for the SmartTots.org website and the video news release—very important data—in March 2011. And still later –the third city that day—back to Cleveland for a wonderful and joyous Christmas party at my boss’ (Dr. Cosgrove of the Cleveland Clinic) house. What a week! You can hear more on healthradio.net every Saturday from 5 to 7 p.m. EST, or follow me on Twitter: @YoungDrMike.

Blog written by Mike Roizen, MD
Dr. Roizen is a past chair of a Food and Drug Administration advisory committee and a former editor for 6 medical journals with...