Life-Saving Science in Action

How can one not think of Congresswoman Giffords and the others who were killed or injured in Tucson … My father spent his last winters in Tucson living near that corner, so I have visited the areas near where the shooting took place many times. It is hard to know what each of us can do to prevent such things from happening again, but harder still to understand why it happened. Sometimes in life we do not get to choose what happens to us, but we always get to choose how we react to events. The people onsite in Tucson reacted with the highest human capabilities and spirit, but are now left to live with the events that took place.

Posted on | Mike Roizen, MD | Comments ()

How can one not think of Congresswoman Giffords and the others who were killed or injured in Tucson … My father spent his last winters in Tucson living near that corner, so I have visited the areas near where the shooting took place many times. It is hard to know what each of us can do to prevent such things from happening again, but harder still to understand why it happened. Sometimes in life we do not get to choose what happens to us, but we always get to choose how we react to events. The people onsite in Tucson reacted with the highest human capabilities and spirit, but are now left to live with the events that took place.

I’ve renewed my commitment to say thanks every day – I write 3 thank you notes. Whether you write a gratitude journal or thank you notes, saying thanks every day really does make it less likely you will suffer illness – you get rewarded for saying thank you. (You may not feel good the first night, but it works faster than even exercise.)

If you watched Dr. Oz on Tuesday, January 11, you got the best coverage of the story as it unfolded. What is the chance that Dr. Oz’s brother-in-law was Giffords’ operating neurosurgeon? If you missed the special report on Giffords’ condition and recovery, click here to watch.  

The 3 best medical stories of the week:

3. This article should be an eye opener to all health-care professionals and maybe to all – 23% of pregnant females who smoke denied it on forms they filled out with their docs (even after they knew they would be tested for it), but then tested positive for more cotenine (what some of the hydrocarbons etc. in cigarettes turn into) in their urine than possible for a secondhand smoker. Denying truth to your doc who can help you – a big “BOO” here. If you know of anyone who smokes and is pregnant or thinking about having a baby, let them know the increased risk of autism and behavior problems in adolescence they are exposing their future children to.

2. Your couch kills. A new study showed that “… those who said they spent 2 or more leisure hours a day sitting in front of a screen were at double the risk of a heart attack or other cardiac event compared with those who watched less. Those who spent 4 or more hours of recreational time in front of a screen were 50% more likely to die of any cause.”

The take-home message is clear – sitting activates something that causes or doesn’t activate something that prevents coronary artery and other arterial diseases.  Maybe having to get up at night to pee is a blessing.  The take home for me: only put TVs in front of exercise equipment and nowhere else. If you buy a TV, you must be able to afford and buy a piece of exercise equipment to put in front of it.  

1. Individuals who had H1N1 are teaching vaccine makers a new strategy for making vaccines more effective.

As for Dr. Oz’s Move It and Lose It in 2011 program, I’m still among the converted. The entry and website is great. Click here for a few helpful tips. Hope you’re enjoying it too – it is never too late to start. 

And my New Year’s resolution for 2011 is intact—smaller portions, and an extra 11 minutes of cardio every day. I’ve tracked them on Sharecare.com.

I urge you to make these choices too – better to seize health while standing than try to find it from a hospital bed bemoning lost opportunities. Seize it – watch The Dr. Oz Show on an exercise bike. 

Blog written by Mike Roizen, MD
Dr. Roizen is a past chair of a Food and Drug Administration advisory committee and a former editor for 6 medical journals with...