YOU: Having a Baby, Plus the Best Med Stories of the Week

Working side by side with Mehmet always invigorates me. Plus, we work late and often miss meals, so I tend to lose weight and waist when I visit him in New York (Mehmet and I usually do phone conferences for 4 hours on Sunday mornings; not the same as sitting side by side). Case in point: last night, we and OB-GYN chief Dr. Margaret McKenzie from the Cleveland Clinic answered 100 of your questions about YOU: Having a Baby during a live video chat we recorded at Fox studios.

Posted on | Mike Roizen, MD | Comments ()

Working side by side with Mehmet always invigorates me. Plus, we work late and often miss meals, so I tend to lose weight and waist when I visit him in New York (Mehmet and I usually do phone conferences for 4 hours on Sunday mornings; not the same as sitting side by side). Case in point: last night, we and OB-GYN chief Dr. Margaret McKenzie from the Cleveland Clinic answered 100 of your questions about YOU: Having a Baby during a live video chat we recorded at Fox studios. 

Isn’t there a green room at Fox stuffed with sandwiches? Normally, but Mehmet and I have run out after tapings or live chats – we are just too tired to pause to eat. So, the studio stopped ordering food. We reached Dr. Oz’s home about 10:20 last night (you won the bet Donna), conducting animated discussions about emails during the drive to his house (luckily, Alex, a professional, drove). Mehmet had been at work since 6:30 a.m., as had I (I used my Airdyne bike at 5:20 a.m. for 40 minutes watching a prerecorded Dr. Oz Show, and walked to get 12,555 steps). Both of us had worked over 15 ¾ hours. He did on air appearances for over 30 different stations all over the country. He was too exhausted to eat. I had a great salad, but that was it; after all, I had to be up at 4:15 a.m. for my plane back to Cleveland – both Dr. McKenzie and I had full days back scheduled at the Clinic (Mehmet had 2 shows to tape). That relative lack of heavy food makes it easier to stay on the Dr. Oz Move It and Lose It in 2011 plan. Hope it is as automatic for you. If not, just follow Dr. Oz around and you’ll eat light, too. 

As to the medical stories of the week, I tweeted these as most important:

Most Important (AND non-quoted anywhere else): Potential national and state med care savings from primary prevention. USA can save $275 billion if we do the possible and decrease type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure by 50%. Click here for more information.

You can read one of last month’s blogs on why this is key for America’s job competitiveness; click here. We are twice as expensive as Europe and 3 times more expensive than developed Asia because we have more than 2 and 3 times the chronic medical conditions. In fact, David Gregory on this past weekend’s Meet the Press kept asking the Democrats he interviewed something like, “But he [Obama] didn’t need to do healthcare … did he not focus on jobs enough?” No David – that is the point. He needed to focus on healthcare to make America competitive for jobs. We need to decrease medical cost as a percent of GDP curve down, or we in America cannot be competitive for jobs. The bill seems to miss that mark (there are some things in it that just might bring the curve down, but we do not know yet.) The health-care bill that was enacted – it did important things to make America more competitive for jobs by forcing us to take control of our health and reduce chronic disease. Heck $257 billion savings from just reducing 2 diseases – and those are doable in many studies.

We can reduce $1.4 trillion in costs a year and not have a deficit if you’d just follow Dr Oz’s advice every day (seriously follow the way Bill Clinton has now). So David, ask the right question, why didn’t the bill address the key issue and what can modify the bill to make us more competitive for jobs (we have a solution) ...   

The second key article of the week was actually 2 studies with 1 important message from the Journal of the American Medical Association: Differences in brain images, in blood proteins and peptides are found years before clinical  dementia occurs. That means drug companies and academic researchers can monitor these images and proteins against new treatments to determine if treatments can slow or reverse dementia before it causes loss of brain function.

The third most important medical story of the week was discussed in last night’s video chat. It has been found that every pregnant woman tested in America had a soup of dangerous chemicals in her amniotic fluid – dangerous for the child. Watch this space for video from the event.

As to Dr Oz’s Move It and Lose It in 2011 program, I’m still among the converted. The entry and website are great. Hope you’re enjoying it too – it is never too late to start. 


And my New Year’s resolution for 2011 is intact – smaller portions, and an extra 11 minutes of cardio every day. I’ve tracked them on the Sharecare.com site.

I urge you to make these choices too – I’m still watching  Dr. Oz on an exercise bike or a treadmill (even typing this on one) . 

Blog written by Mike Roizen, MD
Dr. Roizen is a past chair of a Food and Drug Administration advisory committee and a former editor for 6 medical journals with...