Beating Bisphenol A (BPA)

Bisphenol A (BPA) is ubiquitous in our society. Used in plastics and liners of cans, 90% of us have BPA in our urine when it is tested. BPA increases the risk of breast and prostate cancer, obesity, infertility, diabetes and ADHD. It has all these varied effects because it is an endocrine disruptor altering the hormonal milieu of our bodies.

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Bisphenol A (BPA) is ubiquitous in our society. Used in plastics and liners of cans, 90% of us have BPA in our urine when it is tested. BPA increases the risk of breast and prostate cancer, obesity, infertility, diabetes and ADHD. It has all these varied effects because it is an endocrine disruptor altering the hormonal milieu of our bodies.

Often people feel discouraged about their ability to do anything meaningful to reduce environmental toxins. A new study this week, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspective suggests otherwise. 

Five San Francisco families were served freshly prepared catered meals with minimal use of canned foods. The 20 members of the families had their urinary levels of BPA measured. In just 3 days, the levels dropped by 66%.

This demonstrates the power we have to reduce chemical loads in our bodies with simple changes. Going BPA-free can be as straightforward as purchasing a stainless steel water bottle and using it regularly. Throw away your plastic, and get glass or ceramic food containers instead. When you use plastic wrap, purchase those made of LDPE (low density polyethylene).

BPA has been labeled a toxin in Canada. While our EPA reconsiders, let’s take precaution and do what we can to avoid it!

Blog written by Victoria Maizes, MD
Dr. Victoria Maizes is Executive Director of the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine and a Professor of...