Cancer-Fighting Breakfast Boosters

By Neal D. Barnard, MD Adjunct Associate Professor of Medicine at the George Washington University School of Medicine President of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington, DC Author of the 21-Day Weight Loss Kickstart

Posted on | By Neal D. Barnard, MD | Comments ()

Cancer Fighter #2: Sesame

Top your morning cereal with sesame seeds. Yes, they’ll add a nice crunch, but they are also loaded with vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant. They also provide natural lignans that help balance hormones – a fact that has captured the attention of scientists looking for ways to prevent hormone-related cancers, such as breast and uterine cancer.

Have about one tablespoon of sesame seeds once or twice a week. If you like, save a little for your evening salad.

For extra cancer-fighting power, choose a high-fiber cereal, like old-fashioned oatmeal or bran cereal. Fiber cuts your risk of colon cancer.

 

Cancer Fighter #3: Spinach

So, you’re whipping up an omelet and wondering what to put inside. How about adding some spinach? It’s loaded with folate, a B-vitamin that helps your cells repair DNA damage that could otherwise lead to cancer.

Spinach can be used fresh, steamed, or sautéed. If you prefer, try kale, collards, or broccoli. They have folate, too, and they also boost your liver’s ability to remove cancer-causing toxins from your body.

Just two servings a week will help – but green vegetables are so healthful, I’d suggest having them every day.

Ready to go an extra step? Since the omelet itself has a fair amount of cholesterol and none of the cancer-fighting fiber you need, try replacing it with scrambled tofu. It is almost identical to egg whites, readily taking on the flavors of spices and sauces. My favorite breakfast scrambler recipe is made with spinach and potatoes, with a bit of ground turmeric.

Click here for a complete Cancer-Fighting Breakfast Scramble recipe. You can modify it to include spinach and potatoes, tomato and basil, or curry, peas and cilantro.

Neal D. Barnard, MD

Article written by Neal D. Barnard, MD
Adjunct Associate Professor of Medicine at the George Washington University School of Medicine President of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington, DC Author of Power Foods for the Brain