Crank-Proof Your Diet: 5 Good-Mood Foods

Some of the best weapons to help cure crankiness can be found in your local grocery store.

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Do you have a short fuse when it comes to dealing with life’s everyday stressors, such as your boss, your spouse, or even your kids? Do you reach for food or caffeine during the day in an attempt to feel calm, or find a jolt of energy or a moment of bliss? But above all else, do you just really crave a better mood? If you want to feel significantly less cranky, then read on.

Seek Energy Not Stimulation

While good habits such as eating breakfast every morning and regular meals and snacks throughout the day form the cornerstone of an energized outlook, science has increasingly revealed the vital ways in which our food impacts our mood. And it may surprise you that some of the best weapons to help cure crankiness can be found in your local grocery store. 

The following foods will help your mood in two ways. First, they deliver several key nutrients that play a vital role in supporting brain chemistry to reduce the risk of depression and help improve the quality of your sleep. And they do something equally important as well: Powerful combinations of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants help you build up your energy and capacity to handle life from your body’s deepest levels (your cell’s metabolic and energy pathways). This is what we should all aim for, rather than a quick burst of stimulation from a sugar or caffeine fix that ultimately leaves you feeling cranky or tired. Try making these feel-good foods a part of a delicious new happiness routine.

Salmon


In order for your brain to function optimally, it needs to have the right nutrient building blocks available, and omega-3 fats are one of the most important when it comes to boosting your mood. The brain is 60% fat, and particularly loves omega-3 fats. Most Americans get far too little omega-3 in their diet. And what’s the problem with that? Growing evidence suggests that consuming inadequate amounts of omega-3 fatty acids is associated with depression and poor moods.