The Power of Purple Foods

If you’ve heard you should “eat the rainbow,” you’ve received good advice. Colorful foods are packed with important antioxidants and nutrients. Learn how you can reap the benefits from purple food powerhouses.

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Purple FoodsPlums and Prunes
Plums are a very good source of vitamin C, which can help with iron absorption. They are also a good source of vitamin A, vitamin B2 and potassium. In addition, plums are a good source of dietary fiber. A recent study found that regular prune consumption may decrease blood pressure and LDL (the bad) cholesterol. Additionally, both plums and prunes are full of phenols, natural compounds found in plants, which have protective properties.

Plums are available from May to October, and prunes are available year-round at grocery stores and farmers markets.

Purple FoodsPurple Potatoes
Living up to their royal hue and lineage, purple potatoes have long been considered the food of gods — 7,000 years ago they were reserved for Incan kings in their native Peru. Today, purple potatoes are now grown in thousands of varieties in the US. 

According to the USDA, potatoes with the darkest colors have more than four times the antioxidant potential than other potatoes. Purple spuds score as high as Brussels sprouts, kale or spinach on the antioxidant power scale. These potatoes are also a good source of complex carbohydrates, potassium, vitamin C, folic acid and iron.

Purple potatoes are available year-round, but less so January through April. You can find them in some grocery stores and farmers markets.