Ubiquinol: An Ally Against Aging

By Pina LoGiudice ND, LAc and Peter Bongiorno ND, LAc Directors of Inner Source Health

Posted on | By Pina LoGiudice ND, LAc , Peter Bongiorno ND, LAc | Comments ()

If CoQ10 Is Cheaper, Why Do I Need to Take Ubiquinol?

 There are a few forms of CoQ10 out there. Regular CoQ10, which has been around the longest, is called "ubiquinone." The form we have been referring to mostly in this article is called ubiquinol, and is the non-oxidized, active form of CoQ10 in the body. As demonstrated in studies, ubiquinol has superior bioavailability to ordinary ubiquinone, which means it gets absorbed into the body and blood stream much better.

 

Until recently, the only way to increase ubiquinol levels in the blood was for the body to convert it from ubiquinone (CoQ10), which research has shown becomes increasingly difficult as you age. While regular CoQ10 may be cheaper and will have some benefit, studies strongly suggest that ubiquinol is a more effective form to take.  

 

Dosage and Safety

Various studies supplementing with ubiquinol will prescribe an average of anywhere between 50 mg per day up to 600 mg per day. Severe heart disease and severe neurological issues like Parkinson’s Disease may require the higher level dosages. Studies dosing from 300 mg to 1200 mg per day for 16 months of CoQ10 for four weeks have not shown any concerns of toxicity.

A Ubiquitous Conclusion

The word ubiquitous means “existing everywhere.” Ubiquinol is a molecule that plays an important energy and antioxidant role in every cell in our body. As naturopathic physicians, we want to stress that aging, heart disease, blood pressure and oral health challenges still require that you eat healthily, exercise, and work on lowering stress. No one supplement by itself can cure these challenging conditions. But for great support to help your body energize and balance against damage, ubiquinol can be a healing and solid part of your supplemental regimen.

Pina LoGiudice ND, LAc

Article written by Pina LoGiudice ND, LAc
Co-Medical Director of Inner Source Health in New York

Peter Bongiorno ND, LAc

Article written by Peter Bongiorno ND, LAc
Co-Medical Director of Inner Source Health in New York