Vitamin Q&A: The Best Supplements

By Rovenia Brock, PhD

Posted on | By Rovenia "Dr. Ro" Brock | Comments ()

What are all the different types of B-vitamins and what are the key benefits?

The entire B-vitamin family should be a part of your daily intake.

Thiamin: Also known as vitamin B1, Thiamin is necessary for the body to produce energy from the foods you eat, and is also needed for the synthesis of DNA and RNA. Thiamin is found in a wide variety of foods, although some of the best sources of Thiamin are lentils, whole grains and pork. Thiamin can also be found in red meats, yeast, nuts, sunflower seeds, peas, milk, cauliflower, spinach and legumes.

Riboflavin: Also known as vitamin B2, Riboflavin is a basic building block for normal growth and development. It is needed for healthy energy production and also supports the antioxidant activity in the body. Riboflavin is found in a variety of foods such as fortified cereals, milk, eggs, salmon, beef, spinach and broccoli.

Niacin: Niacin is also known as vitamin B3, and supports over 200 chemical reactions in the body including energy production and fatty acid synthesis. Niacin in the form of nicotinic acid has studied for its role in cardiovascular health. Good sources of Niacin include beef, poultry and fish as well as whole wheat bread, peanuts and lentils.

Pantothenic Acid: Also known as vitamin B5, pantothenic acid helps support fatty acid synthesis and energy production in the body. Pantothenic Acid is widely available in plant and animal food sources. Rich sources include organ meats (liver, kidney), egg yolk, whole grains, avocados, cashew nuts, peanuts, lentils, soybeans, brown rice, broccoli, and milk.

Rovenia "Dr. Ro" Brock

Article written by Rovenia "Dr. Ro" Brock
Nutritionist and Author, Dr. Ro's Ten Secrets to Livin' Healthy