Clinicians’ Corner — March 2018

Learn what was on The Dr. Oz Show in the month of March.

By Michael Crupain, MD, MPH
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Can a Healthy Diet Protect and Improve Your Brain? (3:49)

In March, we presented an important show on a topic affecting health care providers: Suicide. Approximately 400 physicians take their own lives each year and rates of suicide in physicians are higher than in the general population. A recent study found that suicide was the leading cause of death in male residents between 2000 and 2014 and the second-leading cause of death among female residents. The episode featured Dr. Pamela Wible, an advocate for physician suicide awareness and author of “Physician Suicide Letters–Answered,” and Robyn Symon, who created a new documentary on the topic, called “Do No Harm.” If you or someone you know has a problem with serious depression, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention has resources tailored specifically for doctors.

You’ll find summaries for the shows we aired in March below.

Thursday, March 1, 2018

TRUE CRIME THURSDAY: COULD YOU BE THE TARGET OF A KIDNAPPING SCAM? 

Author Dan Buettner joined Dr. Oz to discuss how Americans can incorporate lifestyle practices from the Blue Zones to prevent Alzheimer's. People living in Blue Zones have longer life expectancies and often have rates of Alzheimer's that are a fifth of those in America. Buettner recommended replacing butter with olive oil, eating more legumes instead of meat-based protein, walking daily with a friend, sleeping eight hours a night, and eating more nuts. These tips are aimed at cardiovascular health and brain restoration and are found to be common practice in Blue Zones.

Friday, March 2, 2018

THE THINGS YOU JUST DON’T TALK ABOUT: IS IT OKAY TO KISS YOUR KIDS ON THE LIPS?

On this episode, Dr. Oz addressed topics people are curious about but rarely discuss. The first topic was whether a parent should kiss his or her child on the lips. Family physician Dr. Jennifer Caudle noted that kissing on the lips can technically spread germs, but the risk is relatively low. She also discussed studies that have shown that children who feel emotionally supported and loved tend to be more confident later in life. The takeaway: Kissing kids on the lips may not be for everyone, but is fine for parents who wish to do so.

Dr. Oz then discussed social media, noting that constant use can trigger unhappiness, interfere with productivity, and inhibit in-person conversations. The takeaway: Be sure to limit social media time.

Next, Deepak Chopra joined Dr. Oz to explain that increasing immunity is not just about treating an illness or ingesting vitamin C. They suggested that viewers think about immunity all the time and live a healthy lifestyle to support it. The takeaway: Healthy eating, sleep hygiene, exercise, and stress reduction are all tools for boosting immunity.

Monday, March 5, 2018

FOOLPROOF PANTRY PREP FOR THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET WITH RACHAEL RAY

On this show, Dr. Oz reviewed the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet, including a lower risk of cognitive decline, greater longevity, and a lower incidence of chronic disease and obesity. Rachael Ray then explained the top Mediterranean foods to have on hand, including extra-virgin olive oil, white beans, faro, canned tomatoes, colorful produce, and lean proteins such as sardines.

Next, Dr. Oz addressed a topic that has made headlines: Someone who had a heart attack during sex. Dr. Oz noted that during the first month after a heart attack, doctors generally advise patients to refrain from sexual activity; but after that, it is usually encouraged. Then, health and safety instructor Lynn Duddy of the American Red Cross demonstrated how to do chest compressions in hands-only CPR.

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

TRUE CRIME TUESDAY: HAVE THEY FINALLY CAUGHT THE ATLANTA MONSTER SERIAL KILLER?

On this episode, Dr. Oz discussed the “Atlanta Monster” case with producers Payne Lindsey and Donald Albright, creators of a new podcast about the topic.

Next, Maria Shriver gave tips for managing stress. One was the “power of pause,” where an individual takes a minute to breathe and reflect when he or she begins to feel stress. Shriver presented three scenarios where the practice could be beneficial: Before sending a text; before forwarding news, especially if it’s negative; and before yelling at someone.

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

WHAT KATHIE LEE LEARNED ABOUT GOD AND FAITH

This episode began with Kathie Lee Gifford discussing how she has coped with difficult events in her life, including the recent death of her husband. When she’s going through a tough time, Gifford takes everything day-by-day, in 24-hour increments.

Next, Catherine Price, author of “How to Break Up with Your Phone,” joined Dr. Oz to discuss the epidemic of phone addiction. On average, many people spend four hours per day on phones. Price’s biggest tip for viewers: Turn off annoying and stressful notifications. Many apps automatically sign you up for notifications. If you don’t turn them off, they can be overwhelming and lead to undue stress.

Thursday, March 8, 2018

TRUE CRIME THURSDAY: NANNIES GONE WRONG AND DAYCARE DISASTERS CAUGHT ON TAPE

Some parents have been mortified to find out that their nannies have been physically and/or verbally abusing their children. Dr. Alanna Levine, pediatrician and spokesperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics, gave viewers tips for picking a safe daycare center. She emphasized the need to tour the facility in advance. The takeaway: Closely observe how the staff interacts with children. Check that toys are clean and appropriate for the age of the children playing with them. Finally, quiz the staff members by asking “What would you do if…” questions.

Friday, March 9, 2018

REPEAT

Monday, March 12, 2018

TRUE CRIME: HOUSE OF HORRORS -- PARENTS OF THE TORTURED 13 KIDS SPEAK OUT FROM JAIL EXCLUSIVE, PART 1

On this episode, the sister and cousin of Louise Turpin came on the show to discuss their visits with the Turpins in jail. When asked by her sister about the abuse she had endured when she was a child, Louise Turpin denied ever being abused and was only interested in hearing about her husband, who was in a separate jail. Dr. Oz and psychologist Dr. Brian Russell discussed the possibility that Louise Turpin may have a form of PTSD that has led her to force these memories from her mind.

Next, actor Milo Ventimiglia from the show “This Is Us” joined Dr. Oz. Ventimiglia’s character died of a “widowmaker” heart attack after running into a burning house with no protection. The question addressed in the segment was whether his character could have been saved. Dr. Oz concluded that the mix of toxic fumes, adrenaline, and predisposing heart risks would have made it tough to save Ventimiglia’s character after he had a heart attack.

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

TRUE CRIME: HOUSE OF HORRORS -- EXCLUSIVE DETAILS OF WHAT HAPPENED TO THE 13 KIDS TORTURED BY THEIR PARENTS, PART 2

On this episode, Dr. Oz dove deeper into the lives of Louise and David Turpin to find out how their relationship started.

Next, Dr. Oz had a guest on the show who pulled 14 worms from her eye with no long-term complications. The guest’s doctors, with the help of the CDC, discovered that the worms were a type usually found in cattle. They theorized that a fly dropped eggs in the guest’s eye instead of a cow’s eye while she was helping out on a farm. By pulling out the worms, she ensured they did not scratch her cornea and permanently affect her vision.

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

A DR. OZ SUMMIT: IS THERE A LINK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC DRUGS AND VIOLENT BEHAVIOR?

There has been speculation on social media about a possible link between psychiatric medications and violent behavior. For this show, Dr. Oz invited a panel of experts from a variety of disciplines to discuss the issue.

The panel reviewed the latest data and research and determined that there may be some association between psychiatric medication and violence, but that no research has proven the link to be causal. Also, medications like SSRIs and antipsychotics have been shown to potentially decrease an individual’s chances of committing violent crimes.

Finally, Dr. Drew Pinsky discussed the deadly combination of opioids and benzodiazepines. He encouraged patients to be careful if they are prescribed both medications and called for better education on the dangers of this drug combination.

Thursday, March 15, 2018

REPEAT

Friday, March 16, 2018

REPEAT

Monday, March 19, 2018

IS IT TIME TO END THE WAR ON POTATOES?

Since low-carb diets became popular in the 1990s, potatoes have been viewed as an unhealthy food. Dr. Oz pointed out that potatoes can be healthy options, because they are very low in fat, high in fiber, and satisfying. They become problematic only when prepared in unhealthy ways. He encouraged viewers to eat hot potatoes baked with healthy toppings or cold potatoes in a healthy potato salad. When cooked and cooled, like pasta, potatoes develop resistant starches that are not absorbed by the body. Therefore, potatoes can have a lower glycemic index and can effectively act like fiber in the body.

Dr. Oz then introduced viewers to other healthy and satisfying starches, including jicama, taro, and parsnip. All have fewer calories and more fiber than potatoes, with a similar texture and flavor.

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

TRUE CRIME TUESDAY -- OZ EXCLUSIVE: AMERICAN AIRLINES EMPLOYEE SAVES TEENS FROM HUMAN TRAFFICKING

On this episode, Dr. Oz discussed the story of an American Airlines employee who alerted police after she encountered two young girls traveling alone. Her action helped save them from the sex trafficking industry.

Then, Mary Mazzio, director of the film “I Am Jane Doe,” joined Dr. Oz to share an update on federal legislation aiming to stop online child sex trafficking.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

3 FOODS TO WARD OFF ALZHEIMER’S AND SHARPEN YOUR MEMORY

Max Lugavere, a documentarian and author of “Genius Foods,” joined Dr. Oz to discuss the importance of carotenoids, which have antioxidant properties and may protect the brain against Alzheimer’s disease.

Then, Dr. Daniel Amen explained the idea behind “diabesity,” a term he coined from the combination of “diabetes” and “obesity.” He gave tips to combat these dual problems, including eating fiber-rich foods, adding cinnamon to regulate insulin levels, and including magnesium-rich foods to help manage stress.

Thursday, March 22, 2018

TRUE CRIME THURSDAY: DOCTORS WHO SNAPPED

On this episode, Dr. Oz discussed the epidemic of doctors committing suicide. Families of doctors who died by suicide came on to talk about how there are sometimes very few, if any, signs someone is depressed.

Dr. Oz also addressed the question: Would a doctor who was willing to take his or her life be capable of hurting others? He and other specialists concluded that when a doctor is depressed, overwhelmed, and burned out, his or her work can suffer, but physicians usually care very much about their patients, and research has not shown that they would hurt others when depressed.

Friday, March 23, 2018

ARE YOU A SECRET POOPER?

On this show, Dr. Oz addressed a common problem: Feeling embarrassed to poop in a public restroom. He assured viewers that pooping is a natural part of having a healthy, functioning body and that no one should be embarrassed by it.

Next, Randy and Jason Sklar, comedians and producers of the documentary “Poop Talk,” joined Dr. Oz to discuss frequently asked questions about poop. They discussed hemorrhoids and how a high-fiber diet can help prevent them. Then, they reviewed poop shapes and talked about the shape of healthy poop (it should be long, compact, and able to form an “S” shape). Plus, they revealed whether healthy poop should sink or float (it should sink).

Finally, the medical unit revealed the results of their test on the best ways to cover up a poop smell. The top method was to use a spray made with essential oils and rubbing alcohol.

Monday, March 26, 2018

HAVE WE OVERBLOWN PEANUT ALLERGIES?

On this show, Dr. Oz addressed the growing incidence of peanut allergies and how we might be contributing to it. Doctors used to tell patients to keep infants away from peanuts until the age of one, but recent research has shown that early exposure to peanuts and other common allergy foods lower the incidence of allergies. It is possible more people have allergies now due to a delayed exposure to allergens.

Next, chef Ming Tsai came on the show to discuss how the staff in his restaurant kitchen prepare dishes for customers with allergies. The restaurant has a recipe book that is flagged with common allergens. Tsai emphasized that because this is a labor-intensive process, it is important that customers do not lie about having allergies.

Dr. Oz ended the show by introducing a new device that can test food for bacteria. The device places a special chip in the food to take a bacteria count. It also takes a picture of the food to determine the rate of the bacteria compared to the size of the portion. It’s important to note that the device cannot differentiate between harmless and harmful bacteria.

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

TRUE CRIME TUESDAY: MARCIA CLARK SPEAKS OUT ON WHAT YOU’VE NEVER HEARD IN THE O.J. SIMPSON AND CASEY ANTHONY CASES

On this episode, former prosecutor Marcia Clark joined Dr. Oz to discuss the famous Casey Anthony case. She believes Anthony’s daughter’s death was a homicide, not an accident, and that Casey Anthony got away with murder.

Next, food spy Mitchell Weinberg warned Dr. Oz about the prevalence of food fraud around the world. To avoid food fraud, he suggested viewers avoid pre-made products like pre-ground coffee and spices, pre-blended smoothies, and inexpensive products touting expensive ingredients.

Also, Weinberg advised viewers to buy domestic shrimp from the Gulf of Mexico, instead of shrimp imported from Asia, where farming practices are less regulated.

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

THE QUIZ TO DETERMINE YOUR BRAIN DRAIN TYPE

On this show, psychotherapist Dr. Mike Dow discussed the difference between brain fog and brain drain. He and Dr. Oz presented a short quiz to help viewers identify what type of brain drain they may have.

Thursday, March 29, 2018

TRUE CRIME THURSDAY: MOMS WHO LIVE DOUBLE LIVES

On this episode, Dr. Oz investigated cases of moms who were also drug lords, prostitutes, and other double lives. Psychologist Dr. Brenda Wade weighed in on their stories, saying that women who live double lives — just like women who struggle with addictions — can experience recovery if they work hard for it.

Friday, March 30, 2018

HODA KOTB SPEAKS OUT ON HER LIFE-CHANGING YEAR

“Today Show” host Hoda Kotb joined Dr. Oz to talk about the cancer treatment that left her unable to conceive and how grateful she felt when she was able to adopt her daughter.

Then, Dr. Oz discussed some of the most common causes of toxicity in a home. One culprit is mice, which are often identified by droppings. Another offender is termites, which leave behind small piles of wood shavings. Finally, Dr. Oz warned viewers to watch out for mold, which often hides in corners, baseboards, and bathrooms.

Article written by Michael Crupain, MD, MPH
Michael Crupain, MD, MPH is the Chief of Staff of the Medical Unit at The Dr. Oz Show.