Domestic Abuse Resources

Get the information and help you or your loved one needs.

Domestic Abuse Resources

The National Domestic Violence Hotline
Operating around the clock, seven days a week, confidential and free of cost, the National Domestic Violence Hotline provides lifesaving tools and immediate support to enable victims to find safety and live lives free of abuse. Callers to the hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) can expect highly trained, experienced advocates to offer compassionate support, crisis intervention information and referral services in more than170 languages.  Visitors to this site can find information about domestic violence, safety planning, local resources and ways to support the organization.

Safe Horizon
Safe Horizon is the largest victims’ services agency in the United States, touching the lives of more than 250,000 children, adults, and families affected by crime and abuse throughout New York City each year. We offer assistance to victims through 57 program locations, including shelter, in-person counseling, legal services, and more.
 


Domestic Abuse Helpline for Men and Women
The Domestic Abuse Helpline for Men and Women is a national nonprofit founded in 2000 in Harmony, Maine. Our agency was established to complement the traditional domestic violence shelter programs that specialize in services for women abused by their male intimate partners. We specialize in offering supportive services to men abused by their female intimate partners. However, all who call us, whether they are male or female in a heterosexual or same-sex abusive relationship, are offered the same respect and support because no one deserves to be abused.

4 Steps to Shedding Your Pandemic Pounds

Forgive yourself, and start walking toward a healthier you.

For those of you who have put on the Pandemic Pounds or added several new COVID Curves, you are not alone. Alarmingly, the American Psychological Association has recently published that almost half of all adults in their survey now have a larger physique. In fact, 42% of people reported gaining roughly 15 pounds (the average published was surprisingly 29 pounds but that included outliers) over the past year. Interestingly, 20% of adults in this survey lost about 12 pounds (I am surely not in this group). Clearly, there is a relationship between stress and weight change. In addition, one in four adults disclosed an increase in alcohol consumption, and 67% of participants distressingly revealed that they have new sleeping patterns.

This past year has brought about what has been called the 'new normal.' Social isolation and inactivity due to quarantining and remote working have sadly contributed to the decline in many people's mental and physical health, as demonstrated by the widespread changes in people's weight, alcohol consumption, and sleeping patterns. Gym closures, frequent ordering of unhealthy takeout, and increased time at home cooking and devouring comfort foods have had a perceptible impact. In addition, many people have delayed routine medical care and screening tests over fear of contracting Covid-19 during these visits. Unfortunately, the 'new normal' has now placed too many people at risk for serious health consequences, including heart attacks and strokes.

Keep Reading Show less