How Safe Is Your Drinking Water?

Take action to see if the water in your area is safe.

To find out if there have been any water violations in your area enter your zip code below.


Click here to find the Consumer Confidence Report for your area. If you have any questions about your drinking water or the any of the reports, call the Safe Drinking Water Hotline: 1-800-426-4791. Click here for more information on the hotline.

Decoding Your Results: The EPA has drinking water standards in place to address more than 90 contaminants that may be found in drinking water. If a contaminant has a drinking water standard, it means that EPA has determined that it may occur in public water supplies, that it may have adverse health effects, and that regulation can provide meaningful health risk reduction.

In setting the drinking water standard for a contaminant, the EPA first estimates what level somebody could drink daily for 70 years without being expected to experience health impacts. In determining this non-enforceable public health goal, the EPA consider effects not just on the general population, but also on people who are more sensitive, like babies and pregnant women.

The EPA then sets the enforceable Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL), the maximum level of the contaminant allowed to be in water, as close to the public health goal as feasible, taking into account its ability to measure the contaminant and treat for it, and also the costs. These standards are set using the best available science and the EPA regularly reviews them to make sure they are up to date.

Will you ever feel comfortable in your own skin? That is, if you don't make an effort to protect it? Although 64% of adults do report wearing sunscreen when outside for prolonged periods of time, it turns out that only about 10% of people surveyed actually protect themselves daily, according to a recent review.

No matter what your skin tone is, unless you live in a cave with no sunlight, daily protection with either sunscreen, sunblock or protective clothing can not only protect you from developing sunburns (ouch!) but can significantly reduce your risk of developing skin cancer, particularly the deadliest type called melanoma. In addition, for those of you wanting to keep your youthful looks, daily sunscreen has been shown to reduce the development of wrinkles. A great teacher once told me that the best way to not have wrinkles is not to get them in the first place (think of how much money you can save on useless creams that claim to diminish wrinkles).

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