Maintaining Your Overall Health with Annual Eye Exams

Learn why yearly eye exams are an easy and essential way to protect your eyes and your overall health.

Maintaining Your Overall Health with Annual Eye Exams

Vision is such a core part of our daily experience that we tend to take our eyes for granted. Unless your vision begins to blur or degrade, you may not stop to think about the health of your eyes. As a result, many go years without an eye exam. But yearly eye exams are an easy and essential way to protect your eyes and your overall health.

Changes start small

Changes in vision can be incremental. Vision loss may only be noted when it’s too late to reverse the condition, which is one reason why eye exams are so important. "An eye exam can help your doctor detect problems before you realize they exist," explains Stephen Glasser, OD, FAAO. "During your exam, your eye doctor will look for eye muscle imbalance, vision disorders and eye disease that could potentially cause future problems." An annual eye exam can help your eye doctor identify problems early so you can get treatment before your vision is significantly damaged.

Windows to wellness

Your eyes can also reveal signs of larger problems. Your eye doctor can look inside your eyes for a non-invasive view of your arteries, veins and nerves. During a comprehensive eye exam, your eye doctor can look for damage from diseases like diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, glaucoma, and macular degeneration. With this information, your doctor may be able to stop a new illness in its tracks. That’s why vision exams are a great way to keep tabs on what's happening inside your body, not just in your eyes.

Provided by VSP


Join Maria Menounos as She Cares for Parents With Cancer, Diabetes & COVID in Powerful Video Diary

It hasn't been easy, but she's dedicated her life to helping them — and loving them.

@mariamenounos

Maria Menounos has been caring for her parents for years. Her dad has type 1 diabetes, with his blood sugar levels often dropping dangerously low. And her mom was diagnoses with Stage 4 brain cancer, or glioblastoma, in 2016. As if that wasn't enough, she never thought she would also see them hospitalized with COVID-19. It hasn't been easy, but she's dedicated her life to helping them — and loving them. Go inside her emotional journey in a powerful and moving video diary. She's sharing it all to help others find the strength they need in their own journies.


Keep Reading Show less