Natural Calming Cures

You know the feeling all too well – your palms get balmy, you break into a cold sweat and your brain fogs over. When you’re worried, your body responds both mentally and physically. Luckily, you can take back control with some cures from nature.

Natural Calming Cures

Keep calm with these soothing remedies from Mother Nature. Try the following herbs to decrease worry and stress.

Calming Cures


Lemon Balm
This herb that has been cultivated for over 2,000 years; in the Middle Ages, it was used to minimize anxiety. Try taking 300-500 mg, three times a day to improve your mood. You can find lemon balm in herbal supplements, tea or essential oils.

Calming Cures

Passionflower
Try it for nervous stress and anxiety. Researchers believe that passionflower works by calming the activity of some cells in your brain. You can find it in capsules, teas and herbal supplements. Brew passionflower tea with 1 teaspoon of the herb and drink 3 times daily.

Calming Cures

Valerian Root
When you worry, your body goes into fight-or-flight mode. Your hypothalamus activates your nervous system, which makes the body speed up and become ultra-alert. Adrenaline is released into your bloodstream, causing your heart rate to speed up and your blood pressure to increase. You can combat these jitters with valerian root, a medicinal herb which has a sedative-like effect. In the ancient Greek and Roman empires, valerian was used to treat insomnia. Take 200 mg, three to four times daily. You can find it in capsules, tea or tincture drops.

Exactly How to De-Escalate Aggression From a Stranger

Follow security Expert Bill Staton's important advice to keep yourself safe.

Have you ever had a tense interaction with a stranger in public? Perhaps your shopping carts accidentally knocked into each other or there was a misunderstanding in communication and the other person gets angry. You may wonder how you can de-escalate the aggression and exit the situation safely. So security expert Bill Stanton has your go-to advice for staying alert and protecting yourself in the face of verbal aggression and physical attacks.

THE INITIAL INTERACTION

Bill Stanton: "It always starts with something small, like someone being too close to you, or even more common, you get bumped by a shopping cart. You want to look at their eyes first -it may reveal emotional changes. But you can't rely on just that. Look at what their trunk is doing; a person's torso will reveal their intent. Body language like raising hands, heightened expression, tense shoulders — these are natural responses to a person who is feeling threatened and will escalate. They may begin to zero in on the space between you and them, and their voice will get louder and louder. You want to read this before it gets further and becomes explosive."

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