Dr. Oz School Challenge: Cheat Sheet

Dr. Oz and his HealthCorps team helped a group of students from Brooklyn, New York's New Utrecht High School adopt healthy eating and fitness habits that allowed them to drop weight and trim their waistlines. How did they do it? Let this crib sheet be your guide. While this program was designed for teens, adults can benefit, too.

Dr. Oz School Challenge: Cheat Sheet

Get Started: The Oz School Challenge 4-Step Plan

  1. Exercise: Incorporate 30 minutes of physical activity into your day.
  2. Take the Breakfast Oath: Feed your brain! Students who don't eat breakfast suffer from a 20% drop in performance.
  3. Make Better Choices at Lunch and Don't Skip Meals: Remember to choose wisely. Cut down on fat and pile on quality vegetables.
  4. The Snack Swap: Drop the candy and junk food. Have fruit instead. Plan ahead and pack healthy snacks to eat throughout the day.

Fuel Your Body: Oz-Approved After-School Snacks


These after-school snacks aren't just for kids, they're perfect for anyone trying to lose weight. These smart snack choices will give you extra energy to get through the day and come with added benefits: post-sports replenishment, brain-boosting power and immunity-saving nutrition.

Post-Sports Soy Chocolate Peanut Butter Oatmeal Shake

Soy is a great source of protein, which helps your muscles. 

Ingredients

12 oz. chocolate soy milk (or soy milk with dark cocoa powder and 2 tsp sugar)

3 tbsp oat flour

3 tbsp peanut butter (optional)


Directions

Blend all ingredients with ice. Serve.

Brain-Boosting Walnut and Dark Chocolate Trail Mix

Combine walnuts and small pieces of dark chocolate mixed together in snack bags. This is a great source of Omega-3s.

No-Sick-Days Whole Wheat Pita Pizza With Bell Peppers

The antioxidants and vitamin C in the tomato sauce and peppers will keep you out of the doctor's office and in class.

Ingredients

Whole wheat pita

A few spoonfuls of tomato sauce

A sprinkle of low-fat mozzarella

Sliced red bell peppers


Directions

Assemble and toast pizza in oven for 5 minutes.

For more snack recipes, click here.

Almost-Free Fitness: Work Out for 99 Cents or Less!

Exercise 1: Belly Buster

You'll need a soccer ball-sized rubber ball; the cost is 99 cents. Lay down on the ground with the small of your back on floor; keep your upper back in a lifted sit-up position. Hold the ball in front of your chest, elbows bent. Bring the ball to one side, then the other. At the same time, bring the opposite knee up. Continue to switch sides. This is great for both cardio and strengthening the core muscles.

Exercise 2: Leap Frogs

This workout will cost you nothing - all you need is a pillow and a few feet of space. Place a pillow on the floor. Hop over it, lifting both knees. Continue by jump from one side to the other. You'll get your heart rate going in no time.


For other affordable fitness tips and to see these moves in action, click here.

To learn more about Dr. Oz's HealthCorps, click here.

Looking for more ways to get your entire family involved? Click here to take Dr. Oz's Health Family Challenge.

Q: I end up overeating because it makes me feel better and I never really get full. I'd like to lose weight but this makes it hard. Any suggestions?

A: Being persistently hungry can cause big trouble. So can overeating for comfort/pleasure. These two behaviors, say researchers from Baylor University's Children's Nutrition Research Center, are controlled deep within your brain by serotonin-producing neurons, but operate separately from each other — one in the hypothalamus, the other in the midbrain. They both can, however, end up fueling poor nutritional choices and obesity.

Eating for Hunger

When hunger is your motive for eating, the question is: "Does your body know when you've had enough?" Well, if you are overweight, obese or have diabetes you may develop leptin resistance and your "I am full" hormone, leptin, can't do its job. The hormone's signal to your hypothalamus is dampened, and you keep eating.

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