Protecting Your Eyes in a Hazardous Workplace

Most workplace injuries occur where safety eyewear isn’t required, or left up to the individual to decide if they’ll wear it. Many of those injured on the job didn’t think they needed to wear protective gear, or were wearing eyewear that didn’t provide adequate protection.

Protecting Your Eyes in a Hazardous Workplace
Protecting Your Eyes in a Hazardous Workplace

Hazardous Workplace? Follow These Tips:



Did you know that about 2,000 eye injuries occur every day in the workplace in the U.S.? Almost 70% of accidents happen because of flying or falling objects. And would you believe, most of the objects are smaller than the head of a pin?

Most workplace injuries occur where safety eyewear isn’t required, or left up to the individual to decide if they’ll wear it. Many of those injured on the job didn’t think they needed to wear protective gear, or were wearing eyewear that didn’t provide adequate protection.

Eye Safety Checklist

Here’s a quick checklist to help avoid workplace eye injuries:

Create a safe work environment.

  • Minimize hazards from falling or unstable objects. 
  • Make sure that tools work and that safety features are in place. 
  • Make sure people know how to use tools properly. 
  • Keep bystanders out of hazardous areas. 

Evaluate safety hazards.

  • Identify the primary hazards at the site. 
  • Identify hazards from nearby workers, large machinery, and falling/shifting objects. 

Wear the proper eye and face protection.

  • Select the right eye protection for the work site. 
  • Make sure safety eyewear is in good condition. 
  • Make sure safety eyewear fits right and stays in place. 

Use smart workplace safety practices.

  • Always brush, shake, or vacuum dust and debris from hardhats, hair, forehead, or your brow before removing protective eyewear. 
  • Don’t rub eyes with dirty hands or clothing. 
  • Clean eyewear regularly. 

First Aid for Eye Injuries

But if there is an accident, follow these steps as recommended by the CDC:

Specks in the Eye

  • Don’t rub the affected eye. 
  • Flush the eye with lots of water. 
  • See a doctor if the speck doesn’t wash out, or if pain or redness continues. 

Cuts, Punctures, and Foreign Objects in the Eye

  • Unlike with specks of dust or metal, be sure not to wash out the affected eye. 
  • Don’t try to remove a foreign object stuck in the eye. 
  • Seek immediate medical attention. 

Chemical Burns

  • Immediately flush the eye with water or drinkable liquid. Open the eye as wide as possible. Continue flushing for at least 15 minutes, even on your way to seeking medical care. 
  • If a contact lens is in the eye, begin flushing over the lens immediately. Flushing may dislodge the lens. 
  • Seek immediate medical attention. 

Blows to the Eye

  • Apply a cold compress without pressure, or tape crushed ice in a plastic bag to the forehead and allow it to rest gently on the injured eye. 
  • Seek immediate medical attention if pain continues, if you have reduced vision, or if blood or discoloration appears in the eye. 
Sources: Prevent Blindness America, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

4 Steps to Shedding Your Pandemic Pounds

Forgive yourself, and start walking toward a healthier you.

For those of you who have put on the Pandemic Pounds or added several new COVID Curves, you are not alone. Alarmingly, the American Psychological Association has recently published that almost half of all adults in their survey now have a larger physique. In fact, 42% of people reported gaining roughly 15 pounds (the average published was surprisingly 29 pounds but that included outliers) over the past year. Interestingly, 20% of adults in this survey lost about 12 pounds (I am surely not in this group). Clearly, there is a relationship between stress and weight change. In addition, one in four adults disclosed an increase in alcohol consumption, and 67% of participants distressingly revealed that they have new sleeping patterns.

This past year has brought about what has been called the 'new normal.' Social isolation and inactivity due to quarantining and remote working have sadly contributed to the decline in many people's mental and physical health, as demonstrated by the widespread changes in people's weight, alcohol consumption, and sleeping patterns. Gym closures, frequent ordering of unhealthy takeout, and increased time at home cooking and devouring comfort foods have had a perceptible impact. In addition, many people have delayed routine medical care and screening tests over fear of contracting Covid-19 during these visits. Unfortunately, the 'new normal' has now placed too many people at risk for serious health consequences, including heart attacks and strokes.

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