Lunch Mistakes That Are Making You Fat

You may think you’re eating a healthy lunch, but some diet destroyers are hard to spot. Learn the 4 most common lunch mistakes you could be making and how to avoid them.

Lunch Mistakes That Are Making You Fat

Lunch Mistake #1: Reduced-Fat Peanut Butter

When you take the fat out of peanut butter, there needs to be something added back in to make it taste good. Low-fat peanut butter has added sweeteners, such as the fine sugar used to make icing. Every tablespoon of reduced-fat peanut butter has a teaspoon of sugar in it. It’s better to go for the real thing. Just be careful about portion size.


 

Lunch Mistake #2: Whole Grain Chips

Whole grains provide valuable fiber that can aid digestion and clear toxins out of your system faster. However, whole grain chips can pack a lot of calories and fat in one bag. It’s crucial to read the nutrition label to see the total amount of fat and calories you’re ingesting. Some bags of chips can pack as many as 300 calories and 14 grams of fat per serving. That’s more calories than you’ll find in French fries.

Lunch Mistake #3: Tuna Salad

The mayonnaise in tuna salad can pack on 500 calories and 30 grams of fat. Make a healthy version by skipping the mayonnaise in favor of healthier alternatives like lemon juice, a small amount of low-fat mayonnaise or a tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil.

Lunch Mistake #4: Minestrone Soup

Salt is the secret saboteur in this dish. One bowlful can contain as much as 600 grams of sodium. That’s more than one-quarter of the recommended daily amount – 2300 grams. The healthiest soups are from puréed vegetables, like butternut squash soup.

4 Steps to Shedding Your Pandemic Pounds

Forgive yourself, and start walking toward a healthier you.

For those of you who have put on the Pandemic Pounds or added several new COVID Curves, you are not alone. Alarmingly, the American Psychological Association has recently published that almost half of all adults in their survey now have a larger physique. In fact, 42% of people reported gaining roughly 15 pounds (the average published was surprisingly 29 pounds but that included outliers) over the past year. Interestingly, 20% of adults in this survey lost about 12 pounds (I am surely not in this group). Clearly, there is a relationship between stress and weight change. In addition, one in four adults disclosed an increase in alcohol consumption, and 67% of participants distressingly revealed that they have new sleeping patterns.

This past year has brought about what has been called the 'new normal.' Social isolation and inactivity due to quarantining and remote working have sadly contributed to the decline in many people's mental and physical health, as demonstrated by the widespread changes in people's weight, alcohol consumption, and sleeping patterns. Gym closures, frequent ordering of unhealthy takeout, and increased time at home cooking and devouring comfort foods have had a perceptible impact. In addition, many people have delayed routine medical care and screening tests over fear of contracting Covid-19 during these visits. Unfortunately, the 'new normal' has now placed too many people at risk for serious health consequences, including heart attacks and strokes.

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