The Stash Plan From Laura Prepon

Actress Laura Prepon shares her simple detox plan, including recipes and stretches.

Actress Laura Prepon and integrative nutritionist Elizabeth Troy created the Stash Plan to help the Orange Is the New Black actress with her gallbladder and liver issues, but this budget-friendly plan is perfect for anyone. The Stash Plan includes an easy strategy for healthy eating, with meals that you'll cook yourself, along with powerful stretches to help revitalize your organs for healthy digestion. The pillars of the plan — bone broth, stashing, and stretching — allow you to lose weight and feel healthier without counting calories. See how to get started on Prepon's Stash Plan with this look at the plan's three pillars.

1. Bone Broth

Bone broth is a nutritional fountain of youth, helping you look and feel more vibrant. The delicious broth fills you up, but has minimal calories, and is an ideal way to rejuvenate and detoxify your body. Best of all, making bone broth is easy: simply dump all the ingredients in a slow-cooker and let it simmer all day long.


Tip: Cook the bones as long as possible to get the most nutritional value. You can make bone broth from beef, chicken, or fish bones.

2. Stashing

Twice a week you'll cook foods in bulk, making the basis of your meal building. This part of the plan is all about prepping your food ahead of time so you never have to scramble when you're hungry, and avoid giving in and eating bad-for-you snacks. With the Stash Plan, you only need to spend two days the kitchen to make your meals for the entire week. Each stash includes a macro and micro nutrient-balanced meal, and snacks, too.

Each day, you'll have two proteins, two carbs, and two veggies. Here's a sample Stash Plan meal:

See more of Laura Prepon's Stash Plan recipes.

Tip: Store your stash foods in glass containers; you can use a large thermos for your bone broth. Making delicious nutritious food and the storing it in plastic containers would defeat the purpose of the Stash Plan. 

3. Stretching

Just a few minutes of stretching each day will give you incredible results. Try these three stretches from Prepon's Stash Plan to improve your overall health and well-being.

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