Botox May Make You Happier

Two and a half million people each year now have Botox. That’s the wonder drug that makes your wrinkles go away. And that makes people happy, right? You bet it does. It turns out that people who use Botox can’t frown and people who can’t frown are happier than people who can! The simple act of frowning can turn your mood gloomy. When the frown muscles are paralyzed, it is harder for people to maintain a negative affect.

Two and a half million people each year now have Botox. That’s the wonder drug that makes your wrinkles go away. And that makes people happy, right? You bet it does. It turns out that people who use Botox can’t frown and people who can’t frown are happier than people who can! The simple act of frowning can turn your mood gloomy. When the frown muscles are paralyzed, it is harder for people to maintain a negative affect. 


We all know that when we tell a sad person a joke or even tickle them, we can often break them out of their sullen mood (if they don't give you a whack!) And that may be at least partially because the forehead muscles break their gloomy hold over your appearance and your brain. The mind/body connection is intimately connected and recent Botox studies underscore this!



Having Botox on board seems to give you your own personal dose of a comedian like Wendy Liebman or Robin Williams (together below.)  Dial up the Botox and you may just be able to dial down the Prozac.

 

Exactly How to De-Escalate Aggression From a Stranger

Follow security Expert Bill Staton's important advice to keep yourself safe.

Have you ever had a tense interaction with a stranger in public? Perhaps your shopping carts accidentally knocked into each other or there was a misunderstanding in communication and the other person gets angry. You may wonder how you can de-escalate the aggression and exit the situation safely. So security expert Bill Stanton has your go-to advice for staying alert and protecting yourself in the face of verbal aggression and physical attacks.

THE INITIAL INTERACTION

Bill Stanton: "It always starts with something small, like someone being too close to you, or even more common, you get bumped by a shopping cart. You want to look at their eyes first -it may reveal emotional changes. But you can't rely on just that. Look at what their trunk is doing; a person's torso will reveal their intent. Body language like raising hands, heightened expression, tense shoulders — these are natural responses to a person who is feeling threatened and will escalate. They may begin to zero in on the space between you and them, and their voice will get louder and louder. You want to read this before it gets further and becomes explosive."

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