Cosmetic Surgery Took a Big Hit During the Recession

Each year around this time, the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery releases its member’s statistics. Last year 1 ½ million people went under the knife and 8 ½ million became prettier with needles and peels. The most popular surgery? Breast augmentation and liposuction, followed by eyelid lifts, nose reshaping and tummy tucks. But by far, the most popular procedure was Botox. Over 2 ½ million people purposely injected this into their bodies last year in an attempt to smooth wrinkles. And another 1.3 million people injected Restylane or Juvederm into their wrinkles. And 1.3 million hairy people zapped it off with laser hair removal.

Each year around this time, the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery releases its member’s statistics.  Last year 1 ½ million people went under the knife and 8 ½ million became prettier with needles and peels.  The most popular surgery?  Breast augmentation and liposuction, followed by eyelid lifts, nose reshaping and tummy tucks.  But by far, the most popular procedure was Botox.  Over 2 ½ million people purposely injected this into their bodies last year in an attempt to smooth wrinkles.  And another 1.3 million people injected Restylane or Juvederm into their wrinkles.  And 1.3 million hairy people zapped it off with laser hair removal.

Despite what the media says, over 90% of cosmetic surgery patients are women.  Did the recession hurt?  You bet it did – big ticket items like surgery were down 17%, although nonsurgical procedures were unchanged from the year before.


But how about the procedures that are losing popularity? Hair transplants are fading away, just like the hair that was transplanted. And cheek implants are almost gone – there were less than 2,000 done in the whole country last year.  Browlifts, chin implants, and collagen are also declining in popularity.

There’s good reason for all this.  Cheek implants are a bizarre concept and are rarely needed. Hair transplants often look bad at first and worsen time.  Collagen has been replaced by better fillers, and few people really need their brows lifted onto their foreheads. And how about today’s most popular procedures?  Ten years from now, they might also be called dinosaurs, as they are replaced by better, less invasive, and safer procedures.

4 Steps to Shedding Your Pandemic Pounds

Forgive yourself, and start walking toward a healthier you.

For those of you who have put on the Pandemic Pounds or added several new COVID Curves, you are not alone. Alarmingly, the American Psychological Association has recently published that almost half of all adults in their survey now have a larger physique. In fact, 42% of people reported gaining roughly 15 pounds (the average published was surprisingly 29 pounds but that included outliers) over the past year. Interestingly, 20% of adults in this survey lost about 12 pounds (I am surely not in this group). Clearly, there is a relationship between stress and weight change. In addition, one in four adults disclosed an increase in alcohol consumption, and 67% of participants distressingly revealed that they have new sleeping patterns.

This past year has brought about what has been called the 'new normal.' Social isolation and inactivity due to quarantining and remote working have sadly contributed to the decline in many people's mental and physical health, as demonstrated by the widespread changes in people's weight, alcohol consumption, and sleeping patterns. Gym closures, frequent ordering of unhealthy takeout, and increased time at home cooking and devouring comfort foods have had a perceptible impact. In addition, many people have delayed routine medical care and screening tests over fear of contracting Covid-19 during these visits. Unfortunately, the 'new normal' has now placed too many people at risk for serious health consequences, including heart attacks and strokes.

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