Curiouser and Curiouser

As I make rewarding life changes, I find myself in some rather curious positions. Sometimes feeling like Alice falling down the rabbit hole. Just take the term “rewarding.” I am rewarding myself by making healthier choices, so that I will live longer – and eat along the way.

As I make rewarding life changes, I find myself in some rather curious positions. Sometimes feeling like Alice falling down the rabbit hole. Just take the term “rewarding.” I am rewarding myself by making healthier choices, so that I will live longer – and eat along the way.  


Here’s the curious part; the foods I need to eat to live longer are not always foods I necessarily want to eat more of. (This doesn’t affect wanting to live longer, by the way.) It just makes me question the whole idea of living longer just so I can eat longer, if I’m not going to be eating the foods I love. Are you following me on this down the rabbit hole journey? How far down the rabbit hole do you want to go, Alice?



Curiouser and curiouser. I am a long time meat lover. A carnivore extraordinaire. Meat; it’s for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Meat is the food of choice and I choose it often: the smell, the texture, the taste, the satisfaction – the fat, the calories, the blood-clogging tastiness of it all. Fish has come in a close second, but man cannot live on fish alone. At least, not this man.


Tofu…to-what? On a trip through the grocery store I find plenty of tofu products, some of which I find myself just as suspicious of as Alice is of the Mad Hatter. I find myself supremely suspicious of tofu that is supposed to taste like hamburger, barbecued beef or hot dogs. The plain white tofu, I get. It’s the other stuff I question. Soy is supposed to look like soy, right?

Remembering my rewarding life change – eat healthier to live longer and eat even more – I decide to bite the bullet and enjoy some healthy (for me) tofu products. Forget the beef, forget the fish. It’s time to eat out of the box (figuratively speaking, of course). This is a way of life, meant to be embraced and enjoyed.


Curiouser and curiouser…is exactly how I feel as I cut into a soy product with a very interesting texture to make a wonderful stir-fry. Tempura soy sounds great with a delicious stir-fry. Turns out, it tastes great, too. Who knew? Once I’d gotten used to its interesting texture (reminds me a little of a very soft cheese), I am able to enjoy the taste; which perfectly complements a stir-fry meal, by the way.

Embracing and enjoying a way of life sometimes involves a little experimentation; and right now I’m experimenting a lot with soy’s many forms. I’ve had it for breakfast, added into a healthy egg white omelet; for lunch, crumbled over a nice salad; and dinner, as a suspicious-looking, yet delicious, hamburger.

While I must admit that I will never completely give up meat, soy has turned out to be a curious way for me to add the taste and fullness of meat to my everyday diet, without the fat, calories and blood-clogging side effects. So, Alice, I’m willing to go a little farther down the rabbit hole in satisfying my curiosity about tofu. A little company would be nice, if you’d like to join me.

4 Steps to Shedding Your Pandemic Pounds

Forgive yourself, and start walking toward a healthier you.

For those of you who have put on the Pandemic Pounds or added several new COVID Curves, you are not alone. Alarmingly, the American Psychological Association has recently published that almost half of all adults in their survey now have a larger physique. In fact, 42% of people reported gaining roughly 15 pounds (the average published was surprisingly 29 pounds but that included outliers) over the past year. Interestingly, 20% of adults in this survey lost about 12 pounds (I am surely not in this group). Clearly, there is a relationship between stress and weight change. In addition, one in four adults disclosed an increase in alcohol consumption, and 67% of participants distressingly revealed that they have new sleeping patterns.

This past year has brought about what has been called the 'new normal.' Social isolation and inactivity due to quarantining and remote working have sadly contributed to the decline in many people's mental and physical health, as demonstrated by the widespread changes in people's weight, alcohol consumption, and sleeping patterns. Gym closures, frequent ordering of unhealthy takeout, and increased time at home cooking and devouring comfort foods have had a perceptible impact. In addition, many people have delayed routine medical care and screening tests over fear of contracting Covid-19 during these visits. Unfortunately, the 'new normal' has now placed too many people at risk for serious health consequences, including heart attacks and strokes.

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