David’s Food Log

By keeping a food log, you can control what you eat and make the necessary changes to limit harmful foods, such as those high in fat, carbohydrates and sodium. To start your log, you must write down everything you eat and drink and when you have it. Remember to carry your food log with you or keep it on your computer so you can keep it current. At the end of the week, you should sit down and review the food log day by day to see what you ate and when you ate it. Then, take a pen and circle the foods you know or think to be bad choices and write down what you could substitute for them. Discuss this with your family; having a support system makes this process so much easier.

By keeping a food log, you can control what you eat and make the necessary changes to limit harmful foods, such as those high in fat, carbohydrates and sodium. To start your log, you must write down everything you eat and drink and when you have it. Remember to carry your food log with you or keep it on your computer so you can keep it current. At the end of the week, you should sit down and review the food log day by day to see what you ate and when you ate it. Then, take a pen and circle the foods you know or think to be bad choices and write down what you could substitute for them. Discuss this with your family; having a support system makes this process so much easier.

A side note is that you should also write down how the food was cooked (e.g., fried, grilled or steamed) and what, if any, type of sauces or seasonings it was cooked in. Do this with what you drink (including alcohol) and the amount you’re drinking. I don’t waste calories or fat intake by drinking them.


After you’ve done all that, take a second sheet of paper and plan out your meals for the following week. Writing a plan for the following week will allow you to make better choices. Planning ahead will also allow you to shop and prepare your meals ahead of time. It does not have to be fancy; keep it simple but filling and healthy.

Eating out at a restaurant does not have to be a major dilemma. Keep in healthy and simple; choosing the right foods will help you lose, or maintain, weight.

Tip: Keeping healthy snacks with you at all times, such as any type of fruit or vegetables, will reduce your chances of grabbing a candy bar or a bag of chips.

Tip: If you find yourself out at a bar, order club soda with a twist. If you’re splurging, order a light one and an extra glass of ice. Pour your beer over the ice and before you even take a sip, drink 2 large glasses of water. This will fill you up quicker and reduce your calories intake. Also, pouring beer over ice will make you feel like you are having multiple beers. You can also order a heart-healthy glass of wine.

4 Steps to Shedding Your Pandemic Pounds

Forgive yourself, and start walking toward a healthier you.

For those of you who have put on the Pandemic Pounds or added several new COVID Curves, you are not alone. Alarmingly, the American Psychological Association has recently published that almost half of all adults in their survey now have a larger physique. In fact, 42% of people reported gaining roughly 15 pounds (the average published was surprisingly 29 pounds but that included outliers) over the past year. Interestingly, 20% of adults in this survey lost about 12 pounds (I am surely not in this group). Clearly, there is a relationship between stress and weight change. In addition, one in four adults disclosed an increase in alcohol consumption, and 67% of participants distressingly revealed that they have new sleeping patterns.

This past year has brought about what has been called the 'new normal.' Social isolation and inactivity due to quarantining and remote working have sadly contributed to the decline in many people's mental and physical health, as demonstrated by the widespread changes in people's weight, alcohol consumption, and sleeping patterns. Gym closures, frequent ordering of unhealthy takeout, and increased time at home cooking and devouring comfort foods have had a perceptible impact. In addition, many people have delayed routine medical care and screening tests over fear of contracting Covid-19 during these visits. Unfortunately, the 'new normal' has now placed too many people at risk for serious health consequences, including heart attacks and strokes.

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