Five Things Your Dentist Really Wants You To Know

1. Don’t Wait ‘Til It Hurts. This old adage continues to ring true today. So many patients procrastinate a checkup or treatment simply because of the false notion that “nothing hurts.” Gum disease is a silent, painless, progressive killer of teeth that is also a source of chronic low-grade inflammation to the whole body. Tooth decay is also painless until it becomes deep, which puts you at risk of needing more extensive dentistry such as root canal treatment.

1. Don’t Wait ‘Til It Hurts. This old adage continues to ring true today. So many patients procrastinate a checkup or treatment simply because of the false notion that “nothing hurts.” Gum disease is a silent, painless, progressive killer of teeth that is also a source of chronic low-grade inflammation to the whole body. Tooth decay is also painless until it becomes deep, which puts you at risk of needing more extensive dentistry such as root canal treatment.

2. Plan your work and work your plan. Always get a prioritized treatment plan for the problems that may exist in your mouth. Even if you cannot do all the treatment at the same time, you can get your treatment done in order of importance or necessity to minimize incurring unnecessary costs from disconnected “patchwork” dentistry.


3. Good dentistry may be expensive, but not as much as bad dentistry. Many patients try to “shop” for the cheapest dentist they can find. Often, unknowingly these patients can find themselves in inexperienced hands or with a dentist who uses inferior materials or laboratory services, resulting in ill-fitting dental appliances or dentistry that fails or breaks down quickly.

4. Change the oil. The same way that you need to maintain that new car that you drive off the lot, many patients finish large treatment plans and do not understand the need for follow up care or maintenance. Besides the obvious benefits of prevention, the periodic maintenance is a key component of your ability to function with any restorative treatment you may receive, and the ability of this dentistry to last – including fillings, to veneers, crowns, implants and dentures. 

5. The head bone’s connected to the neck bone. In other words, your mouth is very much a reflection of what can be going on in the rest of your body, and the oral/systemic link is a major topic of interest in medical research. In fact, oral disease puts you at greater risk of diseases of your heart, brain, liver, and pancreas to name a few. Conversely, good oral health is linked to living a longer and healthier life. Keep those regular dental checkups and cleanings.

4 Steps to Shedding Your Pandemic Pounds

Forgive yourself, and start walking toward a healthier you.

For those of you who have put on the Pandemic Pounds or added several new COVID Curves, you are not alone. Alarmingly, the American Psychological Association has recently published that almost half of all adults in their survey now have a larger physique. In fact, 42% of people reported gaining roughly 15 pounds (the average published was surprisingly 29 pounds but that included outliers) over the past year. Interestingly, 20% of adults in this survey lost about 12 pounds (I am surely not in this group). Clearly, there is a relationship between stress and weight change. In addition, one in four adults disclosed an increase in alcohol consumption, and 67% of participants distressingly revealed that they have new sleeping patterns.

This past year has brought about what has been called the 'new normal.' Social isolation and inactivity due to quarantining and remote working have sadly contributed to the decline in many people's mental and physical health, as demonstrated by the widespread changes in people's weight, alcohol consumption, and sleeping patterns. Gym closures, frequent ordering of unhealthy takeout, and increased time at home cooking and devouring comfort foods have had a perceptible impact. In addition, many people have delayed routine medical care and screening tests over fear of contracting Covid-19 during these visits. Unfortunately, the 'new normal' has now placed too many people at risk for serious health consequences, including heart attacks and strokes.

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