Food: Fat and Fiction

Wonder how we’ve become so heavy? So big and fat that we don’t fit our clothes, our seats or our lives? Look to the guy on your left. By 2030, either you or that person will be obese. We’re dying from the junk that’s become our food supply.

Wonder how we’ve become so heavy? So big and fat that we don’t fit our clothes, our seats or our lives? Look to the guy on your left. By 2030, either you or that person will be obese. We’re dying from the junk that’s become our food supply.

It’s time to make a change. “One in three children in the U.S. is considered overweight or obese,” Dr. Kenneth Maynard, a volunteer with the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association, recently wrote in a newspaper editorial.


Maynard asked that food manufacturers adopt the science-based nutrition guidelines proposed by government folks. These guidelines will help families with their food choices and reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke. I second that emotion. Although a few companies have developed their own marketing standards, the food industry as a whole is spoiled, rotten and way past their expiration date on doing something meaningful to combat the millions of premature American deaths caused by obesity.

Organizations that modify or bioengineer foods also contribute to the obesity problem. While some foods have been engineered to last longer and feed people better, many have also been engineered to make you want more. More, more more! These fake foods have added nutrients, for example, or may be made with high-fructose corn syrup or cottonseed and canola oil. Many cereals and snack foods – and even some baby foods – are genetically modified. In fact, most people are unaware that the majority of our food supply is genetically modified (or bioengineered). These are the cold, hard, fat facts.

Some people complain that the engineering process may introduce allergens to the food or contaminate it – just two risks. My problem is that many genetically modified foods are altered to be bigger and taste sweeter (to tickle your tongue in unnatural ways), which means kids eat more of them than they normally would.

That doesn’t even begin to tell the whole weighty story.

Here’s my question to all of you: What do you know about genetically modified foods in your food chain? Is your own personal food chain a junk-food chain? Do you know enough about what you put in you, and how it’s coming to live, as fat, on you? Finding out and making significant lifestyle changes may just save your life.

Have you ever gotten to the last little bit of a vegetable or fruit and thought they only thing left to do was toss it? Or maybe you didn't get to one before it looked like it should be thrown out? Well there's no need to create more food waste! Here are two foods you can regrow right at home instead of throwing out.

Leftover Ginger

  1. Fill a bowl or cup with water and place your bit of ginger root inside.
  2. After a few weeks, watch for little sprouts to form.
  3. At this point, transfer the ginger to some potted soil. Give it plenty of space and moisture.
  4. After a few weeks, harvest your new ginger root!

Sprouted Potato

  1. Note where the sprouts (or eyes) are on the potato. Cut it in half so there are sprouts on both halves.
  2. Let the halves dry out overnight on a paper towel.
  3. Plant the dried potato halves in soil, cut side down.
  4. Small potatoes will be ready to harvest in about 10 weeks, while larger potatoes will be ready in about three to four months.

There's no need for food waste here when you know the tips and tricks to use up all your food at home. And click here to see which foods you can keep past the Sell By date!