The Gym and Cigarettes?

I just don’t get it. I have never been a smoker so I don’t know the addiction firsthand, but I just don’t understand how people leave the gym and immediately light up. Or as they are walking to the gym, flick their cigarette to the side just as they go in. The backwards thinking is incomprehensible to me.

I just don’t get it. I have never been a smoker so I don’t know the addiction firsthand, but I just don’t understand how people leave the gym and immediately light up. Or as they are walking to the gym, flick their cigarette to the side just as they go in. The backwards thinking is incomprehensible to me.

Obviously by taking time out of your day to hit the gym, you are showing concern for your wellbeing and health. Or maybe smokers are more concerned with appearance; as long as they look good, they don’t have to be concerned with the inside. Whatever the reasoning, it totally grosses me out. Or when I see a teen with a cigarette for that matter. I just want to shake them and tell them to quit now!


Again, as I have never been a smoker, I cannot say firsthand how hard it is to quit. What I can say is that, at least with quitting smoking you can treat it like a bandaid - just rip it off the hard way (quit cold turkey). Or you can wean yourself off with a patch. However, it's not the same with weight loss. I have never heard of a chocolate patch (not a bad idea).

The point is you need to eat; you do not need to smoke. You have to find a way to deal with your addiction. You have to find a way to live in moderation. There is no moderation for a smoker. Yes, you can be a pack-a-day smoker or an OP smoker (OP stands for "other people’s." Lingo I just learned that means you don't buy cigarettes, you only smoke other people’s.) But no matter how little or how much you smoke each puff is taking time off your life and doing irreversible damage to your body. But food is another story. You must eat to live and there is no such thing as going cold turkey (unless it’s with mayo on semolina).

But my point is, unlike a smoker who does not have to deal with cigarettes on a daily basis (thankfully smoking is banned in most public places), food addicts must still deal with our addiction every day. Every hour and every minute we are bombarded with visuals as see fast food places on every corner, commercials on TV, etc. We do not have a choice, but to learn how to deal with food. We have to consume in moderation, whereas a smoker does not need to smoke in moderation.

So maybe I am bias as smoking was never my addiction, but I do see how hard it is for a smoker to quit. But to see someone push themselves so hard in the gym and eat properly only to light a coffin nail to their mouth is still very hard for me to grasp. Anyone I know who has some weight to lose but smokes I will always say being 30 lbs overweight is not going to kill you but those cigarettes will. Quit those first!

Your Parent Has Dementia: What to Talk to Their Doctor About

Make sure all their doctors are aware of all the medications she is taking.

Q: My mom is 94 and has dementia. She is taking a whole medicine cabinet-full of medications and I think they actually make her fuzzier. How should I talk to her various doctors about what she is taking and if she can get off some of the meds? — Gary R., Denver, Colorado

A: Many dementia patients are taking what docs call a "polypharmacy" — three or more medications that affect their central nervous system. And we really don't know how that mixture truly affects each individual person.

A new study in JAMA Network that looked at more than 1 million Medicare patients found almost 14% of them were taking a potentially harmful mix of antidepressants, antipsychotics, antiepileptics, benzodiazepines such as Valium and Ativan, nonbenzodiazepine benzodiazepine receptor agonist hypnotics such as Ambien or Sonata, and opioids. And almost a third of those folks were taking five or more such medications. The most common medication combination included an antidepressant, an antiepileptic, and an antipsychotic. Gabapentin was the most common medication — often for off-label uses, such as to ease chronic pain or treat psychiatric disorders, according to the researchers from the University of Michigan.

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