Let Them Eat Cake – I'm Eating Veggies

Fall is here! The farmer's markets are full of every kind of squash, pumpkin and root vegetable! I love them all! I've been a big fan of these delicious and healthy vegetables for quite some time. Some folks I've been connecting with through facebook have not even tried a spaghetti squash or butternut squash! Here is what I propose to you this week! Head to your local produce stand or farmer's market and get 2 or 3 new squash that you have never tried before. Chop them into quarters, take out the seeds and brush a little olive oil on them. Turn them face down on a cookie sheet and bake at 350 ° F for about 30 minutes or until tender with a fork. You can also add some large chopped purple onion, sweet potatoes, sugar pumpkin, beets. Once they are tender, remove them and keep in your fridge. You can easily reheat them for lunch, dinner or a snack. There are lots of great varieties out there!

Fall is here! The farmer's markets are full of every kind of squash, pumpkin and root vegetable! I love them all! I've been a big fan of these delicious and healthy vegetables for quite some time. Some folks I've been connecting with through facebook have not even tried a spaghetti squash or butternut squash! Here is what I propose to you this week! Head to your local produce stand or farmer's market and get 2 or 3 new squash that you have never tried before. Chop them into quarters, take out the seeds and brush a little olive oil on them. Turn them face down on a cookie sheet and bake at 350 ° F for about 30 minutes or until tender with a fork. You can also add some large chopped purple onion, sweet potatoes, sugar pumpkin, beets. Once they are tender, remove them and keep in your fridge. You can easily reheat them for lunch, dinner or a snack. There are lots of great varieties out there!

You can also take the fully cooked squash off the skin and blend it with some plain Greek-style yogurt, vegetable broth and make into a soup with a little sage, sea salt and black pepper. There are endless ideas you can do with these vegetables!


Give it a try!

What's Really Causing Your Obesity: Nature or Nurture?

It's more complex than too many calories and not enough physical activity.

The American Medical Association officially recognized obesity as a disease in 2013. But in the past 13 years, there's not been much of a shift in the understanding of what causes obesity — not in the general public, in people who contend with the condition or in the practice of medicine. Most people still think of obesity as a character flaw caused by too many calories and not enough physical activity. But it's much more complex than that.

A study analyzing National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data found that even though US adults' BMI increased between 1988 and 2006, the amount of calories adults consumed and the energy they expended were unchanged. It also appears that the quality of calories consumed (low versus high glycemic index) is as important a consideration as the total quantity. And genetics only explains about 2.7% variation in people's weight, according to a study in Nature. That all adds up to this: The two most common explanations for obesity — calories in, calories out and family history — cannot, by themselves, explain the current epidemic.

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