Low Calorie = High Stress

The next time you consider drastically cutting calories in an attempt to lose weight, chew on this. A study out of University of California, San Francisco found that cutting calories increased production of cortisol, the stress hormone, which is linked to added belly fat. Researchers randomly assigned women to 1of 4dietary groups.

The next time you consider drastically cutting calories in an attempt to lose weight, chew on this. A study out of University of California, San Francisco found that cutting calories increased production of cortisol, the stress hormone, which is linked to added belly fat. Researchers randomly assigned women to 1of 4dietary groups.

The women who were asked to limit their calories to 1200 daily and record it were found to have higher levels of cortisol. Why should you care about this? Well, cortisol tells the body that it is in a state of stress and as a survivial mechanism, the body holds onto weight as much as possible. That translates into less weight loss success for you. If you watched Steve's Unhealthiest American update, you know that I asked him to rev up his metabolism by actually increasing calories. Remember, the key is to understand is that quality of calories can mean more than quantity.


Focus on getting high nutrient foods and stop focusing on deprivation – your body will only work against you!

Have you ever gotten to the last little bit of a vegetable or fruit and thought they only thing left to do was toss it? Or maybe you didn't get to one before it looked like it should be thrown out? Well there's no need to create more food waste! Here are two foods you can regrow right at home instead of throwing out.

Leftover Ginger

  1. Fill a bowl or cup with water and place your bit of ginger root inside.
  2. After a few weeks, watch for little sprouts to form.
  3. At this point, transfer the ginger to some potted soil. Give it plenty of space and moisture.
  4. After a few weeks, harvest your new ginger root!

Sprouted Potato

  1. Note where the sprouts (or eyes) are on the potato. Cut it in half so there are sprouts on both halves.
  2. Let the halves dry out overnight on a paper towel.
  3. Plant the dried potato halves in soil, cut side down.
  4. Small potatoes will be ready to harvest in about 10 weeks, while larger potatoes will be ready in about three to four months.

There's no need for food waste here when you know the tips and tricks to use up all your food at home. And click here to see which foods you can keep past the Sell By date!