My Passion: Keeping You Healthy

The week that was: After the Chicago Health Expo last Saturday – more than 10,000 in attendance – I made a quick trip to Boston to talk about how good walnuts are for health. Sunday, I enjoyed the Browns win over the Patriots. After, I got to give a motivational talk to a group of insurance professionals in Phoenix, followed by over 2000 gynecologists in Las Vegas.

The week that was: After the Chicago Health Expo last Saturday – more than 10,000 in attendance – I made a quick trip to Boston to talk about how good walnuts are for health. Sunday, I enjoyed the Browns win over the Patriots. After, I got to give a motivational talk to a group of insurance professionals in Phoenix, followed by over 2000 gynecologists in Las Vegas.

One of the great preventers of premature aging is to live a passion every day. I get to do that, as my passion is to motivate you to choose behaviors that keep you younger and more vigorous. I get to live that – getting to live out your passion is great. I have all of you to thank for that.


Next, back to The Dr. Oz Show to talk about maintaining the Just 10 program during the holidays. You’ll have to tune in, no shortcuts. North Americans gain 1 to 5 pounds a year—the same as we gain from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Day.  So, young Dr. Oz and I gave you the keys to stay on the Just 10 plan, and had fun doing it.

Back to Cleveland where I and a team of crack Cleveland Clinic internists, led by Dr. Lang, hashed out what tests and supplements to give routinely to men and women over the age of 40. We looked not just at the guidelines and the medical research, but also at how to motivate our patients. For example, should every woman with some persistent bloating get an ultrasound of her ovarian area? Yes, we believe. How often? Every 6 months or every 2 years. The data isn’t clear, but a normal test result doesn’t mean no ovarian cancer; it takes repeated negatives. 

On Wednesday of this week, I get to work with the 2 best chefs in the world (you’ll have to guess which ones) in Las Vegas to create brain-healthy, great tasting food for the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas. We’ll show you that the best ingredients for your brain – salmon, chia seeds, blueberries, walnuts and more – can taste spectacularly great without any of the stuff that ages your brain, like sugar and saturated fat.

One last tip for the day: how can you spot a BPA-free receipt? Look for the red threads in your receipt paper. Don’t handle any other receipt without washing well before eating or touching food or your mouth. Your largest risk of BPA exposure is handling a typical fast food restaurant or gas station receipt (more than 75% of such receipts are printed on BPA-laden paper), and then touching your food. (BPA is believed to cause feminization of males, reduced sperm function in adult men, and premature maturity and increased breast cancer risk in female children and women.)  

In case you missed it, here’s how to make your RealAge younger: Stay on the Just 10 challenge during the holidays. Have a passion and live it daily (my wife Nancy’s my other passion). If you have chronic bloating and negative ultrasound results, get a second opinion. And only handle receipts with red threads and wash your hands after touching any receipts.

4 Steps to Shedding Your Pandemic Pounds

Forgive yourself, and start walking toward a healthier you.

For those of you who have put on the Pandemic Pounds or added several new COVID Curves, you are not alone. Alarmingly, the American Psychological Association has recently published that almost half of all adults in their survey now have a larger physique. In fact, 42% of people reported gaining roughly 15 pounds (the average published was surprisingly 29 pounds but that included outliers) over the past year. Interestingly, 20% of adults in this survey lost about 12 pounds (I am surely not in this group). Clearly, there is a relationship between stress and weight change. In addition, one in four adults disclosed an increase in alcohol consumption, and 67% of participants distressingly revealed that they have new sleeping patterns.

This past year has brought about what has been called the 'new normal.' Social isolation and inactivity due to quarantining and remote working have sadly contributed to the decline in many people's mental and physical health, as demonstrated by the widespread changes in people's weight, alcohol consumption, and sleeping patterns. Gym closures, frequent ordering of unhealthy takeout, and increased time at home cooking and devouring comfort foods have had a perceptible impact. In addition, many people have delayed routine medical care and screening tests over fear of contracting Covid-19 during these visits. Unfortunately, the 'new normal' has now placed too many people at risk for serious health consequences, including heart attacks and strokes.

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