The Oz Show Medical Unit

Only 4 days till kickoff -- no more preseason for the Oz crew. I was in the control room for the kickoff show and it was as good as I’ve seen Dr. Oz: his information superb, the show was grabbing, and Dr. Oz was serious when needed, and playful at all other times.

Only 4 days till kickoff -- no more preseason for the Oz crew. I was in the control room for the kickoff show and it was as good as I’ve seen Dr. Oz: his information superb, the show was grabbing, and Dr. Oz was serious when needed, and playful at all other times.

What happens behind the scenes is really incredible…More than 17 days before each taping (taped before a live audience) the producers and assistant producers go thru many, many of your suggested ideas until coming up with topics that will stimulate you.  The Medical Unit, headed by Senior Producer, Susan Wagner, consists of a group of assistant producers and medical students who have taken a year or more off to bring this information to you (with me as the guiding doc.) Ten days before taping, the staff prepares summaries of the medical issues and Susan and I review these before structuring the segment.  A producer and a senior producer for each segment are assigned after review by the entire producer team and Dr. Oz. 


The medical content is written into summaries that are progressively and repeatedly vetted. Did the woman who asked about what happens in her vagina mean that?  Does the woman who only has sex once a month, but wants more, fear that she will lose her husband? These issues are reviewed by the production team and Dr. Oz many times (often up to 20 times before taping) only 17 or so days after the medical unit first reviewed it crafted the segment.

Bored? Don’t be. And you won’t be. Cause what you see on your TV screen often changes so much on the day of taping due to the show’s spontaneity, that only the general subject and the accuracy of the medicine is recognizable to those of us who saw the scripts.

Will you ever feel comfortable in your own skin? That is, if you don't make an effort to protect it? Although 64% of adults do report wearing sunscreen when outside for prolonged periods of time, it turns out that only about 10% of people surveyed actually protect themselves daily, according to a recent review.

No matter what your skin tone is, unless you live in a cave with no sunlight, daily protection with either sunscreen, sunblock or protective clothing can not only protect you from developing sunburns (ouch!) but can significantly reduce your risk of developing skin cancer, particularly the deadliest type called melanoma. In addition, for those of you wanting to keep your youthful looks, daily sunscreen has been shown to reduce the development of wrinkles. A great teacher once told me that the best way to not have wrinkles is not to get them in the first place (think of how much money you can save on useless creams that claim to diminish wrinkles).

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