Push Through the Plateau

There comes a time when even after you’ve broken through the barrier of negative thoughts – you know the ones that float around your head and tell you what you can’t do – that you defy all manner of self-pity and push through to weight-loss success. Eureka!!!

There comes a time when even after you’ve broken through the barrier of negative thoughts – you know the ones that float around your head and tell you what you can’t do – that you defy all manner of self-pity and push through to weight-loss success. Eureka!!!

Finally there are pounds and inches lost, you’re fitting into your skinny jeans, and life is all you hoped it would be. But wait – the scale stops moving downward and there are 5 maybe 10 (fill in the blank here) more pounds to shed. Well fret no more! Here are my tips to Push Through the Plateau to the finish line:


  1. Zig-Zag your calories! Your body will adjust to food (calories, really) just as it does to the mundane routine of walking on a treadmill day in and day out – yawn – and when it does, it stops working as hard as it could to burn fat and calories. So crank it up! How, you ask? Well, you must keep your body guessing. Say you’re consuming 1,200 calories a day (which I recommend for most women on a weight-loss regimen, unless you’re exercising REALLY heavily), you’ll want to start the week by consuming 1,100 calories a day, then 1,050 calories, the next day 1,100 calories, then 1,200 calories, and so on. The trick is to keep the body guessing by reducing or increasing 50-100 calories each day. Eating this way turns up the body’s energy-burning power and kicks your metabolism into high gear. Va-room!
  2. Eat your water! Eat high-volume foods like veggies, fruits, lean protein (grass-fed meats), fish and poultry that contain lots of nutrients and water. Eat more of the foods that are high-volume and contain high-concentrations of nutrients instead of those that are calorically-dense and have few nutrients (candy, cakes, pies, cookies, soda, chips, corn curls and highly processed foods).
  3. Start your day with a sundae! This sounds like an oxymoron if you ever heard one – I know! But think of it this way – we’re not talking about an ice cream sundae with whipped cream fatness. Nooo! YOUR sundae is made with fresh fruit: strawberries (half-cup), half of a banana, low-fat greek yogurt, 1 tbsp ground flaxseed, and sprinkled with my favorite secret ingredient – matcha green tea. Hint: the macha green tea powder can be a little bitter to taste so mix with Greek yogurt and it's deelish! Now that my “secret” is out I should mention the reason for the ah-hem “secret” ingredient is that it contains caffeine and metabolism-boosting properties. The sundae in general is a metabolism-booster in that it is low-calorie, rich in omega-3s and protein. Bottom line? It’s a metabolism-booster that starts your fat-burning machine. Click here to print out the recipe.

Now go – with your revved-up metabolism – and put that body to work with a great workout. I’m watching you and rootin’ for ya too!

Your Parent Has Dementia: What to Talk to Their Doctor About

Make sure all their doctors are aware of all the medications she is taking.

Q: My mom is 94 and has dementia. She is taking a whole medicine cabinet-full of medications and I think they actually make her fuzzier. How should I talk to her various doctors about what she is taking and if she can get off some of the meds? — Gary R., Denver, Colorado

A: Many dementia patients are taking what docs call a "polypharmacy" — three or more medications that affect their central nervous system. And we really don't know how that mixture truly affects each individual person.

A new study in JAMA Network that looked at more than 1 million Medicare patients found almost 14% of them were taking a potentially harmful mix of antidepressants, antipsychotics, antiepileptics, benzodiazepines such as Valium and Ativan, nonbenzodiazepine benzodiazepine receptor agonist hypnotics such as Ambien or Sonata, and opioids. And almost a third of those folks were taking five or more such medications. The most common medication combination included an antidepressant, an antiepileptic, and an antipsychotic. Gabapentin was the most common medication — often for off-label uses, such as to ease chronic pain or treat psychiatric disorders, according to the researchers from the University of Michigan.

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