The Recent Attention to Eggs In Our Food Supply

Eggs have been in the news a lot lately and not for a good reason: the recent salmonella scare has made people wary of egg consumption – people are checking their cartons at home and perhaps avoiding eggs all together. Even I am a bit scared. I dined at my favorite local breakfast spot on Sunday and I asked my poor waitress at least 6 questions about the eggs I wanted to order.

Eggs have been in the news a lot lately and not for a good reason: the recent salmonella scare has made people wary of egg consumption – people are checking their cartons at home and perhaps avoiding eggs all together. Even I am a bit scared. I dined at my favorite local breakfast spot on Sunday and I asked my poor waitress at least 6 questions about the eggs I wanted to order.

Eggs are a great way to get essential vitamins and minerals in our diets and while it’s horrible that people are becoming sick from certain recalled eggs, the positive aspect is that many are now realizing that there may be a connection to the treatment of animals in our food supply and illness. Author Michael Pollan says in his new book “Food Rules” that we should only eat animals that have themselves been fed and treated well. Next time you buy or consume food deriving from animals, ask yourself where your food came from and try to imagine the life it led before finding its way to your plate. It’s an interesting perspective that many of us choose not to focus on. Isn’t it about time to start focusing?


J&J Vaccine and Blood Clots: What to Know If You Already Got the Shot

Six cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis have been reported among the 6.8 million people who received the J&J vaccine.

After the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was associated with cases of "rare and severe" blood clots, the U.S. government recommended officials pause giving the shot. But nearly 7 million people have already received the vaccine. So the news has a lot of people wondering if they should be concerned and what they need to look for.

The short answer: "Don't panic."

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