Slower Food for Weight Loss

Calories are not the only thing that matters when you are trying to lose weight. A few recently published studies showed how eating whole foods like almonds and chewing your food thoroughly can give you the dieter’s edge.

Slower Food for Weight Loss
Slower Food for Weight Loss

Calories are not the only thing that matters when you are trying to lose weight. A few recently published studies showed how eating whole foods like almonds and chewing your food thoroughly can give you the dieter’s edge.

Researchers found that when each bite of food was chewed 40 times, participants in the study ate 12% less. And an hour later, blood levels of the hormone ghrelin, which stimulates appetite, were lower. It may not be rocket science, but slowing down the pace of eating and chewing your food more may boost your weight loss.


Almonds, when incorporated into a breakfast meal, can help make you feel more full for the rest of the day. Participants in the study who ate 225 additional calories from whole almonds with their meal of cream of wheat and orange juice felt fuller during the day than those who ate the same number of calories from almond butter. The protein, fiber and healthy fats, when controlled in portions, can be waistline-friendly.

Every little bit counts! Use these tips along with your other healthy habits to shave calories and whittle your waistline.

Provided by Kathleen Zelman, MPH, RD. Kathleen Zelman is a nationally-known nutrition correspondent, editor, and contributing writer of diet and nutrition articles. She currently serves as Director-at-Large on the ADA Board of Directors, and received the prestigious American Dietetic Association (ADA) Media Excellence Award for her contribution and commitment to educating consumers about food and nutrition issues through the media.


4 Steps to Shedding Your Pandemic Pounds

Forgive yourself, and start walking toward a healthier you.

For those of you who have put on the Pandemic Pounds or added several new COVID Curves, you are not alone. Alarmingly, the American Psychological Association has recently published that almost half of all adults in their survey now have a larger physique. In fact, 42% of people reported gaining roughly 15 pounds (the average published was surprisingly 29 pounds but that included outliers) over the past year. Interestingly, 20% of adults in this survey lost about 12 pounds (I am surely not in this group). Clearly, there is a relationship between stress and weight change. In addition, one in four adults disclosed an increase in alcohol consumption, and 67% of participants distressingly revealed that they have new sleeping patterns.

This past year has brought about what has been called the 'new normal.' Social isolation and inactivity due to quarantining and remote working have sadly contributed to the decline in many people's mental and physical health, as demonstrated by the widespread changes in people's weight, alcohol consumption, and sleeping patterns. Gym closures, frequent ordering of unhealthy takeout, and increased time at home cooking and devouring comfort foods have had a perceptible impact. In addition, many people have delayed routine medical care and screening tests over fear of contracting Covid-19 during these visits. Unfortunately, the 'new normal' has now placed too many people at risk for serious health consequences, including heart attacks and strokes.

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