Spring, Get Here Quick!

Terri’s View: Today, with the temperature in the Northeast reaching over 50 degrees, we experienced a brief reprieve from the bitter cold and snow we’ve been hit with this dreadful winter. I’m not rejoicing just yet though - tomorrow will be back to the thirties. Either way, it felt nice just to have the kids play outside for a glorious hour. Just the thought of warmer temperatures makes me eager to say goodbye to winter for good! But I know it is premature to be doing a happy dance.

Terri’s View: Today, with the temperature in the Northeast reaching over 50 degrees, we experienced a brief reprieve from the bitter cold and snow we’ve been hit with this dreadful winter. I’m not rejoicing just yet though - tomorrow will be back to the thirties. Either way, it felt nice just to have the kids play outside for a glorious hour. Just the thought of warmer temperatures makes me eager to say goodbye to winter for good! But I know it is premature to be doing a happy dance.

Thinking of spring reminds me that summer will soon be next. Warmer weather means shorts, capris and – gulp - bathing suits. But now is the time to think of these things. Now is the time to prepare our bodies for warmer weather and summer clothes. If we can make changes now, we can happily show off the results in a few short months.


Start by changing some eating habits and, once the warm weather comes, take some walks. The motivation will be there if you start making changes now. Swap that soda for water and an evening ice cream for a sugar free jello. Perhaps, by the time spring comes you could be down a few and will want to start exercising.

Weather definitely contributes to our moods. I know when its cold and rainy I just want some comfort foods and do not want to schlep to the gym. While spring be here soon (although, not soon enough for some of us!) the time to make changes is now.

Ed’s View: With Groundhog’s day behind us, we’re hoping for that early spring to arrive soon. But it seems like it depends on which groundhog you speak to – it’s still pretty cold here in the Northeast. We’re hope for the warmer weather.

It’s funny how we think about our food habits over the course of a year. At the start of fall people stress about the Holidays – not about the shopping that needs to be completed but about of the parties and the rich food the season brings. We resolve to live healthier lifestyles around the New Year. And, by this time of year, we start thinking of the warmer weather once again stress about BBQs and summer parties.

What a cycle we have created for ourselves! We need to re-think this process and look at the positives the spring summer season does bring. I enjoy being outside, going for a walk with the kids, playing some ball or just being in the back mowing the lawn… OK, the mowing I can do without. I also look forward to the time spent with friends and family.

I remember that while I was losing weight it was always great to meet up with friends. They never failed to mention that Terri and I looked great – talk about motivation! It made us feel great and enforced that our lifestyle change was working.

If this is your first spring with a new look - enjoy it! You have learned to eat properly, go to the gym and waited the entire winter. As far as a BBQ or a party - enjoy the people and, yes, have some food within reason.

Like the groundhog each year he pokes his head out of his home and looks for the signs of spring, people who have been living on the less healthy side of life, look forward to springing into a new outlook and great time of year.

What's Really Causing Your Obesity: Nature or Nurture?

It's more complex than too many calories and not enough physical activity.

The American Medical Association officially recognized obesity as a disease in 2013. But in the past 13 years, there's not been much of a shift in the understanding of what causes obesity — not in the general public, in people who contend with the condition or in the practice of medicine. Most people still think of obesity as a character flaw caused by too many calories and not enough physical activity. But it's much more complex than that.

A study analyzing National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data found that even though US adults' BMI increased between 1988 and 2006, the amount of calories adults consumed and the energy they expended were unchanged. It also appears that the quality of calories consumed (low versus high glycemic index) is as important a consideration as the total quantity. And genetics only explains about 2.7% variation in people's weight, according to a study in Nature. That all adds up to this: The two most common explanations for obesity — calories in, calories out and family history — cannot, by themselves, explain the current epidemic.

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