Still Sexy After All These Years: Tips for Your 40s, 50s and 60s

When you look in the mirror in the morning, do you grimace in dismay or do you smile and give yourself a fun wink? Whether you’re 40, 50, or 60, the girl with the wink will probably win the Still Sexy contest. Beauty is a state of mind first and foremost. That said, there are several dietary measures and exercise regimes that can help improve your overall physical being and enhance your sex appeal. There are also some really good techniques that can keep your skin looking healthy and beautiful.

When you look in the mirror in the morning, do you grimace in dismay or do you smile and give yourself a fun wink? Whether you’re 40, 50, or 60, the girl with the wink will probably win the Still Sexy contest. Beauty is a state of mind first and foremost. That said, there are several dietary measures and exercise regimes that can help improve your overall physical being and enhance your sex appeal. There are also some really good techniques that can keep your skin looking healthy and beautiful.


As you age, your body has different nutritional requirements. When you are in your 40s you need a low-fat and high-fiber diet complete with Omega-3 essential fatty acids. This will help reduce your calories, boost your metabolism, and keep your heart healthy too.


During your 50s, calcium and phytoestrogens become extra important nutritional needs. If you find yourself suddenly struggling with weight gain due to hormonal changes, you will also need to reduce your calories and modify your lifestyle with increased healthy activities.

As you progress through your 60s, you need to maintain a balanced diet. Increasing your fiber intake can help combat some bowel problems that become more common during this age range.


In addition to calcium, iron, vitamin C, and folic acid that can help ease age progression by maintaining a healthy body, you also need to be physically active. Following your doctor’s guidelines for your age and lifestyle will help keep your energy up. Dancing is one of the best forms of exercise you can get. It is fun, releases endorphins, and it shapes the body and the mind. Recent tests are even linking dancing with a reduced chance of getting Alzheimer’s.


When you get older your skin becomes more prone to sensitivity and damage. While you still need a healthy daily dose of vitamin D, it is important not to abuse your time in the sun. Once you have absorbed your vitamin D  (it only takes about 10 minutes), be sure to wear protective coverage, sun block, a hat, and sunglasses. Use lotion daily to keep your skin smooth. You may also want to consider glycolic peels fillers to rejuvenate your face.


Glycolic peels are chemical peels made from a sugar cane substance called alphahydroxy acid (AHA). Essentially, it works by lightly peeling away the outermost layers of your skin, which are the ones that are the most damaged. Although it is not a surgical procedure, a sedative can be used with it. Since it is effective at removing the damaged layers and wrinkles but it is not as harsh as a deeper peel, glycolic peels are becoming more common in skin rejuvenation therapy.


No matter how old you are, if you eat right and take care of yourself, you can look and feel great. Keep your mind in shape, too, and remember that beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

So, behold yourself sexy and you will be sexy. How are you handling the aging process? Have you changed your diet to meet your body’s needs? Are you thinking about having a glycolic peel?

Your Parent Has Dementia: What to Talk to Their Doctor About

Make sure all their doctors are aware of all the medications she is taking.

Q: My mom is 94 and has dementia. She is taking a whole medicine cabinet-full of medications and I think they actually make her fuzzier. How should I talk to her various doctors about what she is taking and if she can get off some of the meds? — Gary R., Denver, Colorado

A: Many dementia patients are taking what docs call a "polypharmacy" — three or more medications that affect their central nervous system. And we really don't know how that mixture truly affects each individual person.

A new study in JAMA Network that looked at more than 1 million Medicare patients found almost 14% of them were taking a potentially harmful mix of antidepressants, antipsychotics, antiepileptics, benzodiazepines such as Valium and Ativan, nonbenzodiazepine benzodiazepine receptor agonist hypnotics such as Ambien or Sonata, and opioids. And almost a third of those folks were taking five or more such medications. The most common medication combination included an antidepressant, an antiepileptic, and an antipsychotic. Gabapentin was the most common medication — often for off-label uses, such as to ease chronic pain or treat psychiatric disorders, according to the researchers from the University of Michigan.

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