Which One Are YOU: A Talker or a Doer?

How many times have you told yourself that you wanted to lose 5, 10, 15, or 20 pounds? The best intentions are always there; however, we sometimes fail to put our plan into action. It seems that the goal of losing weight is always looming over our heads. We may make changes for 1 week, yet soon after our efforts fade into the background.

How many times have you told yourself that you wanted to lose 5, 10, 15, or 20 pounds? The best intentions are always there; however, we sometimes fail to put our plan into action. It seems that the goal of losing weight is always looming over our heads. We may make changes for 1 week, yet soon after our efforts fade into the background.

What I have noticed is that it is a lot easier to talk about losing weight, but it’s another story to do something about it. I say this because I know from experience. After gaining weight from my child-bearing years, the pounds seemed to add up – as did my plans for doing something about it. I always talked about losing weight. Occasionally, I tried a gimmick here and there to no avail. The thought of getting back my pre-pregnancy body was just that – a thought that I talked a lot about, but never really did anything about. Looking back, I realize that I was nothing more then a talker.


Having the opportunity to work along with Dr. Oz, Dr. Roizen and their staff has made me be more than just a talker. I was accountable to my mentor and coach Dr. Roizen, and this made me transform myself into being a doer. I found that they were teaching me the ropes to successful weight loss. I no longer had an excuse, because I finally knew what or how I needed to do to lose the weight. I was given the knowledge, and it was up to me to put one foot in front of the other and actually do something about my situation.

Being accountable to Dr. Roizen, “the Enforcer,” forced me to move to action. I had to report my daily steps and food journal. I had to be accountable and responsible for my actions. I no longer had the option of sitting there and waiting for the right time, I could no longer just talk about it; now I had to be about it!

Making that transformation from being a talker to a doer has reaped so many benefits for me. I have learned much about healthy eating and living. I have had the privilege of helping others and assisting them to reach their goals. I have completed races and pushed myself to physical limits I never thought possible. My energy levels are up and I am now on a mission along with my dear friend and fellow housewife, Toni Winston, to continue to pass along all this knowledge on to others.

I have a question for you. If you were given the tools to guarantee weight loss, would you actually take it on and do something about it, or would you continue to just talk about wanting to lose weight? The choice to be a talker or doer is completely up to!

Want to do something about it, but you’re not sure how to proceed or need someone to help you get through it? I would love to hear from you and help you along. Drop me a line stacyryoudocs@gmail.com.

Q: I end up overeating because it makes me feel better and I never really get full. I'd like to lose weight but this makes it hard. Any suggestions?

A: Being persistently hungry can cause big trouble. So can overeating for comfort/pleasure. These two behaviors, say researchers from Baylor University's Children's Nutrition Research Center, are controlled deep within your brain by serotonin-producing neurons, but operate separately from each other — one in the hypothalamus, the other in the midbrain. They both can, however, end up fueling poor nutritional choices and obesity.

Eating for Hunger

When hunger is your motive for eating, the question is: "Does your body know when you've had enough?" Well, if you are overweight, obese or have diabetes you may develop leptin resistance and your "I am full" hormone, leptin, can't do its job. The hormone's signal to your hypothalamus is dampened, and you keep eating.

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