The Truth About Retirement Plans and IRAs

All the strategies you need to build savings, select the right investments, and receive the retirement income you want

The Truth About Retirement Plans and IRAs

A guide to making the most of your retirement plans and assuring long-term financial security. Everyone knows that saving for your retirement is important. Yet only half of all eligible Americans contribute to a retirement plan. That’s because all plans — including the 401(k), 403(b), 457, and even the IRA — are complicated, confusing, and costly. New York Times bestselling author and acclaimed financial advisor Ric Edelman has created a step-by-step guide sharing everything you need to know as a plan participant: how to contribute even when you think you can’t afford to, how to make wise choices among your investment options, and how to convert your 401(k) into income so you can provide yourself with the lifestyle you want in retirement. For more information, visit www.edelmanfinancial.com.

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High Blood Pressure: Why You Shouldn't Ignore This Silent Killer | Rounds With Dr. E

About one in five people have high blood pressure and they don't even know it

For those of you who love murder mysteries, there just may be a silent killer wreaking havoc inside of you. Untreated hypertension, or high blood pressure, can go undetected for a long period of time, mainly because most people with elevated blood pressure do not experience any symptoms. In fact, about one in five people with high blood pressure are walking around unaware that they even have high blood pressure. Left untreated, hypertension can place you at a significantly increased risk for heart attacks, strokes, aneurysms tearing open, heart failure, kidney failure, blockages in your legs, dementia, vision problems including blindness, and sexual dysfunction (I bet that last one got some of your attention).

How to Read Your Blood Pressure Numbers

Your blood pressure is made up of two numbers. The top number, called the systolic blood pressure, is the pressure inside your arteries when your heart contracts. The bottom number, the diastolic blood pressure, is the pressure inside your arteries when your heart relaxes. Both numbers are important and should be monitored. As people age, both numbers tend to increase, mainly due to increased stiffness in large vessels. Frighteningly, many studies have demonstrated that just a 20 mm Hg (units used for blood pressure) increase in the systolic number, or a 10 mm Hg increase in the diastolic number, doubles one's risk of death from heart disease or stroke.

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