This Is What a 2000-Calorie Plan Looks Like

Find out what to eat by using this handy guide.

This Is What a 2000-Calorie Plan Looks Like

If you want to lose a few pounds or simply improve your wellness habits, determining how many calories to eat per meal can be really helpful. This 2000-calorie meal plan serves as a general guidepost to help get you started. With the help of registered dietitian Megan Casper, M.S., RDN, owner of Nourished Bite Nutrition, you can choose from two different options for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. As always, consult your doctor before starting any weight-loss plan to make sure it suits your needs. Once you get the hang of making these meals, you can start mixing and matching different ingredients to keep things fresh and find your favorite combinations. By eating well-balanced meals full of protein, fiber, and healthy fat, you will stay satisfied longer and give your body the nutrients it needs.

More: This Is What an 1800-Calorie Plan Looks Like


Breakfast

Start your day off with a hearty but healthy breakfast between 500-550 calories. Recent studies have shown that having a filling breakfast can stave off hunger later, which can help you maintain and lose weight. French toast doesn’t have to weigh you down - try it with whole wheat bread topped with a cup of berries, both of which are filled with gut-friendly fiber. Serve with a side of yogurt or go ahead and drizzle on a bit of maple syrup. If you need a filling but satisfying breakfast fast, scramble up some eggs with kale and top with shredded cheese and salsa for a breakfast burrito you can munch on during your commute.

More: 20 Breakfasts You Can Make in 5 Minutes or Less

4 Steps to Shedding Your Pandemic Pounds

Forgive yourself, and start walking toward a healthier you.

For those of you who have put on the Pandemic Pounds or added several new COVID Curves, you are not alone. Alarmingly, the American Psychological Association has recently published that almost half of all adults in their survey now have a larger physique. In fact, 42% of people reported gaining roughly 15 pounds (the average published was surprisingly 29 pounds but that included outliers) over the past year. Interestingly, 20% of adults in this survey lost about 12 pounds (I am surely not in this group). Clearly, there is a relationship between stress and weight change. In addition, one in four adults disclosed an increase in alcohol consumption, and 67% of participants distressingly revealed that they have new sleeping patterns.

This past year has brought about what has been called the 'new normal.' Social isolation and inactivity due to quarantining and remote working have sadly contributed to the decline in many people's mental and physical health, as demonstrated by the widespread changes in people's weight, alcohol consumption, and sleeping patterns. Gym closures, frequent ordering of unhealthy takeout, and increased time at home cooking and devouring comfort foods have had a perceptible impact. In addition, many people have delayed routine medical care and screening tests over fear of contracting Covid-19 during these visits. Unfortunately, the 'new normal' has now placed too many people at risk for serious health consequences, including heart attacks and strokes.

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