7 Tasty Salt Substitutes

Ditch the sodium without sacrificing flavor.

7 Tasty Salt Substitutes

By Reina Berger

These days, it seems like hidden salts are popping up in all kinds of unexpected foods. As it turns out, over 75% of our daily salt intake is linked to hidden salts in items like frozen meals, canned goods, and bread. Consuming too much salt can cause a spike in blood pressure, which may increase your odds of a stroke, heart attack, or kidney problems. To avoid putting a strain on your organs and stay as healthy as possible, try these seven delicious and flavorful substitutes courtesy of Dr. Jennifer Caudle, Assistant Professor at Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine. Trust us, you won't even miss the salt!


More: The Plan to Break Up With Salt

Paprika

This versatile spice can be used in countless ways. Known as Hungary's national spice, paprika is great in omelettes and on top of deviled eggs, pasta, meat dishes, any variety of potatoes, roasted nuts, and even on popcorn if you are looking for a good salt replacement. While some versions can be quite spicy, you can also find a more mild and even sweet version if you don't like a kick to your meals.

More: Martina McBride's Smoked Paprika Almonds

Q: I end up overeating because it makes me feel better and I never really get full. I'd like to lose weight but this makes it hard. Any suggestions?

A: Being persistently hungry can cause big trouble. So can overeating for comfort/pleasure. These two behaviors, say researchers from Baylor University's Children's Nutrition Research Center, are controlled deep within your brain by serotonin-producing neurons, but operate separately from each other — one in the hypothalamus, the other in the midbrain. They both can, however, end up fueling poor nutritional choices and obesity.

Eating for Hunger

When hunger is your motive for eating, the question is: "Does your body know when you've had enough?" Well, if you are overweight, obese or have diabetes you may develop leptin resistance and your "I am full" hormone, leptin, can't do its job. The hormone's signal to your hypothalamus is dampened, and you keep eating.

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