7 Tasty Salt Substitutes

Ditch the sodium without sacrificing flavor.

7 Tasty Salt Substitutes

By Reina Berger

These days, it seems like hidden salts are popping up in all kinds of unexpected foods. As it turns out, over 75% of our daily salt intake is linked to hidden salts in items like frozen meals, canned goods, and bread. Consuming too much salt can cause a spike in blood pressure, which may increase your odds of a stroke, heart attack, or kidney problems. To avoid putting a strain on your organs and stay as healthy as possible, try these seven delicious and flavorful substitutes courtesy of Dr. Jennifer Caudle, Assistant Professor at Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine. Trust us, you won't even miss the salt!


More: The Plan to Break Up With Salt

Vinegar

To add flavor to salads, roasted vegetables, fish, coleslaw, and other savory dishes, you can use red and white wine or balsamic vinegar for an added tanginess. Some types are more mild than others, so you can choose based on which flavor profile you desire. You can also use certain types of vinegar to tenderize meat thanks to its high acidity.

More: Oz Family Dressing

Have you ever gotten to the last little bit of a vegetable or fruit and thought they only thing left to do was toss it? Or maybe you didn't get to one before it looked like it should be thrown out? Well there's no need to create more food waste! Here are two foods you can regrow right at home instead of throwing out.

Leftover Ginger

  1. Fill a bowl or cup with water and place your bit of ginger root inside.
  2. After a few weeks, watch for little sprouts to form.
  3. At this point, transfer the ginger to some potted soil. Give it plenty of space and moisture.
  4. After a few weeks, harvest your new ginger root!

Sprouted Potato

  1. Note where the sprouts (or eyes) are on the potato. Cut it in half so there are sprouts on both halves.
  2. Let the halves dry out overnight on a paper towel.
  3. Plant the dried potato halves in soil, cut side down.
  4. Small potatoes will be ready to harvest in about 10 weeks, while larger potatoes will be ready in about three to four months.

There's no need for food waste here when you know the tips and tricks to use up all your food at home. And click here to see which foods you can keep past the Sell By date!