What to Do Every Hour of a Holiday Party to Avoid Weight Gain

Follow these tips round the clock to avoid holiday overeating.

What to Do Every Hour of a Holiday Party to Avoid Weight Gain

By Toni Gasparis

It’s that time of year – the time of lots of parties and the overeating that comes along with it. While the holidays can be an exciting time to see family and friends and have some fun, they can also cause a lot of stress for fear of gaining weight. Use these tips from Dr. Oz’s trusted experts to arm yourself with the hourly tools needed to make sure you get through each party this season without added guilt.


More: Your Survival Guide to Get Through the Holidays

9 a.m.

Make sure you go to bed at a decent hour the night before the party you are attending so you can wake up in the morning refreshed and energized. Nutritionist Maya Feller stresses the importance of good quality sleep all the time, but especially during the holiday season. A good night’s rest will ensure that your sleep deprivation doesn’t cause bad lapses in judgment when it comes to food choices.

More: 5 Easy Steps to a Better Night’s Sleep

High Blood Pressure: Why You Shouldn't Ignore This Silent Killer

About one in five people have high blood pressure and they don't even know it

For those of you who love murder mysteries, there just may be a silent killer wreaking havoc inside of you. Untreated hypertension, or high blood pressure, can go undetected for a long period of time, mainly because most people with elevated blood pressure do not experience any symptoms. In fact, about one in five people with high blood pressure are walking around unaware that they even have high blood pressure. Left untreated, hypertension can place you at a significantly increased risk for heart attacks, strokes, aneurysms tearing open, heart failure, kidney failure, blockages in your legs, dementia, vision problems including blindness, and sexual dysfunction (I bet that last one got some of your attention).

How to Read Your Blood Pressure Numbers

Your blood pressure is made up of two numbers. The top number, called the systolic blood pressure, is the pressure inside your arteries when your heart contracts. The bottom number, the diastolic blood pressure, is the pressure inside your arteries when your heart relaxes. Both numbers are important and should be monitored. As people age, both numbers tend to increase, mainly due to increased stiffness in large vessels. Frighteningly, many studies have demonstrated that just a 20 mm Hg (units used for blood pressure) increase in the systolic number, or a 10 mm Hg increase in the diastolic number, doubles one's risk of death from heart disease or stroke.

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