The Health Benefits of Tea

Find out all the ways to boost your health and feel better, just by drinking tea.

The Health Benefits of Tea

For centuries, tea has been used in alternative medicine to treat everything from cancer to constipation. Recent research supports these claims: Studies have shown that tea may protect against heart disease, Alzheimer's and many types of cancer. You may think that if you’ve tried one tea, you’ve tried them all, but that’s not the case. There's a wide range of flavors within every type of tea and host of different preventative health benefits. Learn how sipping on a cup of the right kind of tea could be the answer to your health problems.

Watch: Dr. Oz Explains the Health Benefits of Different Teas


Yerba Mate Tea

For Weight Loss
Popular in South America, yerba mate tea is chockfull of antioxidants and vitamins and can help you lose fat. It contains the fat-fighting compound mateine, which gives you a metabolism and energy boost. Known as a cravings-killer, it saves you from consuming empty calories you'd normally reach for. Additionally, yerba mate does not produce the caffeine-related crashes that some people experience with coffee and can give you 3-4 hours of very stable, clean energy.

Watch: 3 Teas That Will Shrink Your Waist

Q: I end up overeating because it makes me feel better and I never really get full. I'd like to lose weight but this makes it hard. Any suggestions?

A: Being persistently hungry can cause big trouble. So can overeating for comfort/pleasure. These two behaviors, say researchers from Baylor University's Children's Nutrition Research Center, are controlled deep within your brain by serotonin-producing neurons, but operate separately from each other — one in the hypothalamus, the other in the midbrain. They both can, however, end up fueling poor nutritional choices and obesity.

Eating for Hunger

When hunger is your motive for eating, the question is: "Does your body know when you've had enough?" Well, if you are overweight, obese or have diabetes you may develop leptin resistance and your "I am full" hormone, leptin, can't do its job. The hormone's signal to your hypothalamus is dampened, and you keep eating.

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