10 Filling Summery Salads You Can Make at Home

Crisp, fresh salads are wonderful on a hot summer day, but you need more than just lettuce and veggies to make a meal. These salads have ingredients loaded with filling protein, fiber and healthy fats—and they’re easy to make.

10 Filling Summery Salads You Can Make at Home

When summer’s heat is on, warm, heavy dinners tend to lose their appeal. Instead we crave foods that are light, cool, and fresh. Salads are ideal for this kind of hot-weather eating, but too often they’re dismissed as insubstantial meals.

Not so fast. It’s actually easy to make a light, yet filling salad if you have the right formula. All you need is a balance of fiber, protein, and good fats. It’s that easy. Take a look at these ideas for simple, substantial salads you can make at home this summer. Maybe they’ll inspire you to come up with some combinations of your own.


Provided by Dr. Oz The Good Life Magazine

South of the Border Salad

Toss crisp chopped romaine with black beans, corn kernels, plus diced avocado and red bell pepper. Every bite of this super salad is designed to sate your appetite. All of the ingredients provide filling, heart-healthy fiber, from the veggies to the beans to the avocado. The black beans also add lean, plant-based protein. Plus, avocados deliver satisfying beneficial monounsaturated fatty acids, which are a source of energy. Make a quick vinaigrette using equal parts olive oil (another good-fat superstar) and lime juice flavored with chopped fresh cilantro and a dash of cumin powder.

Q: I end up overeating because it makes me feel better and I never really get full. I'd like to lose weight but this makes it hard. Any suggestions?

A: Being persistently hungry can cause big trouble. So can overeating for comfort/pleasure. These two behaviors, say researchers from Baylor University's Children's Nutrition Research Center, are controlled deep within your brain by serotonin-producing neurons, but operate separately from each other — one in the hypothalamus, the other in the midbrain. They both can, however, end up fueling poor nutritional choices and obesity.

Eating for Hunger

When hunger is your motive for eating, the question is: "Does your body know when you've had enough?" Well, if you are overweight, obese or have diabetes you may develop leptin resistance and your "I am full" hormone, leptin, can't do its job. The hormone's signal to your hypothalamus is dampened, and you keep eating.

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