10 Plant-Based Oils You Didn't Know Existed

Olive and canola aren't the only plant-based oils out there. These 10 plant-based oils are completely real—and completely fantastic.

10 Plant-Based Oils You Didn't Know Existed

Cooking with olive or canola oil is one of the smartest moves you can make in the kitchen. In addition to taste and versatility, both of these plant-based oils contain heart-healthy mono- and polyunsaturated fats, good fats that improve blood cholesterol levels, thus lowering your risk of heart disease and stroke. Healthy fats also help your body better absorb the fat-soluble vitamins found in food, and they provide vitamin E, an essential antioxidant that many Americans need more of in their diets.

There’s just one catch: Olive and canola oil aren’t the only plant-based oils that offer these great benefits. In fact, there are numerous plant-based oils that check off many of the same boxes as olive or canola oil. And by incorporating different oils into your routine, you’ll add variety, interesting new flavors, and best of all, additional health benefits. Read on to discover 10 more plant-based oils to add to your grocery list.


Provided by Dr. Oz The Good Life Magazine

Apricot Kernel Oil

Made from the dried kernels of apricots, this versatile oil has a clean, mild flavor. It’s neutral enough for salad dressing, but can also be used for sautéing, pan-frying, and other high-heat cooking methods. Like olive and canola oil, apricot kernel oil contains heart-healthy mono- and polyunsaturated fats. Health food stores and some supermarkets stock apricot kernel oil; it’s also available online.

Q: I end up overeating because it makes me feel better and I never really get full. I'd like to lose weight but this makes it hard. Any suggestions?

A: Being persistently hungry can cause big trouble. So can overeating for comfort/pleasure. These two behaviors, say researchers from Baylor University's Children's Nutrition Research Center, are controlled deep within your brain by serotonin-producing neurons, but operate separately from each other — one in the hypothalamus, the other in the midbrain. They both can, however, end up fueling poor nutritional choices and obesity.

Eating for Hunger

When hunger is your motive for eating, the question is: "Does your body know when you've had enough?" Well, if you are overweight, obese or have diabetes you may develop leptin resistance and your "I am full" hormone, leptin, can't do its job. The hormone's signal to your hypothalamus is dampened, and you keep eating.

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