7 Low-Carb Hacks You Need to Try

Learn how to ditch carbs without missing them.

7 Low-Carb Hacks You Need to Try

Are you tired, hungry, and moody while on a low-carb diet? There’s no need to feel miserable — carbohydrates are the most misunderstood aspect of healthy eating. Eating low carb shouldn’t sabotage your weight loss goals or deplete your energy, you just have to use the right approach! Here are the seven best low-carb hacks to try you can say goodbye without missing them.

Watch: Settling the Carb Debate Once and for All


Complex Carbs

Instead of trying to cut out carbs completely, focus on eating more complex carbs - skipping carbs altogether can make you lethargic and prone to eating more later in the day. So to comfortably maintain your diet, make sure the carbs are complex, meaning whole grains, starchy veggies, sweet potatoes, beans, oats, etc. They keep you full longer, help with digestion (as these foods all have a high fiber content), and don't spike your blood sugar level, making you crash later. Try to have 40% of your total caloric intake for the day come from complex carbohydrates.

More: Savory Sprouted Grain Bread Recipes

Your Parent Has Dementia: What to Talk to Their Doctor About

Make sure all their doctors are aware of all the medications she is taking.

Q: My mom is 94 and has dementia. She is taking a whole medicine cabinet-full of medications and I think they actually make her fuzzier. How should I talk to her various doctors about what she is taking and if she can get off some of the meds? — Gary R., Denver, Colorado

A: Many dementia patients are taking what docs call a "polypharmacy" — three or more medications that affect their central nervous system. And we really don't know how that mixture truly affects each individual person.

A new study in JAMA Network that looked at more than 1 million Medicare patients found almost 14% of them were taking a potentially harmful mix of antidepressants, antipsychotics, antiepileptics, benzodiazepines such as Valium and Ativan, nonbenzodiazepine benzodiazepine receptor agonist hypnotics such as Ambien or Sonata, and opioids. And almost a third of those folks were taking five or more such medications. The most common medication combination included an antidepressant, an antiepileptic, and an antipsychotic. Gabapentin was the most common medication — often for off-label uses, such as to ease chronic pain or treat psychiatric disorders, according to the researchers from the University of Michigan.

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