How to Avoid a Summer Cold

Learn the different ways to prevent the summer sniffles so you can enjoy the warm weather instead.

How to Avoid a Summer Cold

At any point during the year, you’re likely to fall victim to the common cold. A runny nose, sore throat, coughing and sneezing can keep you under layers of blankets and tissues. But it’s finally summer and who wants to be stuck inside on a hot and sunny day? According to the National Institute of Health (NIH), winter colds are caused by rhinoviruses but summer colds are caused by more resilient enteroviruses. The irony of summer colds is that they can last longer than winter colds and may make you feel even worse. Follow these tips to stay healthy throughout the season.

Watch: Natural Cold Cures


Fight Back Against Germs

Like us, bacteria thrive in warmer environments. Summer is typically filled with beach trips, pool days, barbecues and backyard parties, where you are more likely to come in contact with many different germs. If you are traveling this summer, beware of the germs on airplanes and in hotels. One of the most important ways to block viral transmissions is to always wash your hands thoroughly. If you don’t have access to a sink with soap and water, carry hand sanitizer or wipes. You can also pack a handy kit with cold relief products such as saline drops, acetaminophen and ibuprofen just in case.

More: 8 Tricks to Stay Healthy While Traveling

Exactly How to De-Escalate Aggression From a Stranger

Follow security Expert Bill Staton's important advice to keep yourself safe.

Have you ever had a tense interaction with a stranger in public? Perhaps your shopping carts accidentally knocked into each other or there was a misunderstanding in communication and the other person gets angry. You may wonder how you can de-escalate the aggression and exit the situation safely. So security expert Bill Stanton has your go-to advice for staying alert and protecting yourself in the face of verbal aggression and physical attacks.

THE INITIAL INTERACTION

Bill Stanton: "It always starts with something small, like someone being too close to you, or even more common, you get bumped by a shopping cart. You want to look at their eyes first -it may reveal emotional changes. But you can't rely on just that. Look at what their trunk is doing; a person's torso will reveal their intent. Body language like raising hands, heightened expression, tense shoulders — these are natural responses to a person who is feeling threatened and will escalate. They may begin to zero in on the space between you and them, and their voice will get louder and louder. You want to read this before it gets further and becomes explosive."

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